Monday, Starts April 2

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. All levels welcome.

0 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Nuclear Arms Control in a Stressful Time

Paul Rockett

The cloud of nuclear conflict has shifted from the steppes of Russia to the smaller countries of Iran and North Korea with few good options in hand. The practice of Nuclear Arms Control can offer us some needed solutions; participants will learn about its history, organization, and uses. No prior historical or scientific knowledge is required. Past treaties and confidence-building measures will demonstrate the means and advantages of limiting arms between nations. The detailed political mechanics of arms control regimes in the US will reveal the complexity of arms control implementation. Lastly, the science and technology of identifying nuclear warheads will point to new directions for future nuclear weapons limitation agreements.

55 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley
Cancelled

Awakenings

Noga Wizanski

Explore the experience of “awakening” to new understandings of the world and our place in it. Awakenings can shake us loose from assumptions and lead to profound and challenging shifts in our relationships, personal stories, and values.

$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory, Part 2

Peter Ralston

Investigate the activities of nerve cells and how drugs or disease alter their functioning. Discuss neuronal networks that serve major mechanisms, such as vision and sleep, and changes in the brain that impair memory functions. Each lecture will include a basic neuroscience topic and related clinical concepts. This course will contain both new and familiar topics from Ralston’s previous classes.

37 slots available
$145.00

Tuesday, Starts April 3

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Building a Great Memoir

Louise Nayer

Uncover potent moments from your past through the basic elements of memoir: sensory detail, scene versus summary, dialogue, time shifts, tension, and voice. Read great memoirists to get started. Do in-class exercises and work with peers. Hand in weekly pages for comprehensive instructor feedback. Leave the class with a body of writing.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center -- Arts & Sciences Room, Lafayette

Mythic Dimensions of Modern Life

Edwin Bernbaum

The myths and rituals of traditional cultures can give us surprising new insights into the stories, ideas, and practices of modern life. This thought-provoking exploration of the deeper dimensions of science, society, and culture will focus on understanding the equivalents at work in our lives, such as the Idea of Progress and the American Dream. Recover their power to awaken a renewed sense of personal meaning and fulfillment.

24 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Six Great Rock and R&B Singers

Peter Elman

Take a cultural and musical journey through the lives and careers of six legendary rock and R&B singers: the “Genius” Ray Charles; the “King of Soul” Sam Cooke; the “Voice” Roy Orbison; the “Big O” Otis Redding; the “Queen of Soul” Aretha Franklin; and Dusty Springfield. Explore these musical giants through lectures, photographs, recorded and live music, film clips, and question-and-answer sessions.

203 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Positive Impact of Gratitude

Sara Orem

People who experience and practice gratitude cope better with stress and enjoy more robust physical health. Based on “The Science of Happiness,” a globally popular class taught by Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, this course will use articles, video, and discussion to help you develop gratitude practices and explore the challenges of consistency. Note: This course blends online and in-person learning.

9 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

The Silk Road: The Eastern End

Hossein Khosrowjah

For more than 2,000 years, the Silk Road carried more than commercial goods. It was an instrument of globalization before the term was coined.

126 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Holding On and Letting Go

Lauren Vanett

As we age, how can we uncover and integrate the wisdom we have gained while continuing to grow and change? In this experiential class, we will use mindfulness and grounding practices to cultivate presence and shift from a fixed to a growth mindset. We will also explore resilience and flexibility by embracing opposites, such as giving and receiving, holding on and letting go, and solitude and connection. For new and returning students.

9 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

Leonard Cohen: Tower of Song

Jannie Dresser

Long before Leonard Cohen gained fame as a singer, he was a prize-winning poet and budding novelist. He was deeply influenced by Judaism, Catholicism, and Buddhism, and drew on diverse cultural references in songs of love, conflict, war and peace, and the vagaries of belief. Look beyond his triumphant “Hallelujah” as we explore a 60-year career and the inspirations behind his provocative, erotic, and often dark lyrics.

117 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Music of Bach

Stephen Schultz

Cover major aspects of Bach’s instrumental and vocal music. Discuss the principles of historically informed performance practice in relation to modern and period instrument performances. Discover his musical influences as we work our way through the cantatas and Passions, instrumental music, and final masterpieces — B Minor Mass, Goldberg Variations, and the Art of the Fugue.

124 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Understanding Film Sound

Mark Berger

Explore the nature, evolution, use, and abuse of sound in cinema. While there is a high degree of visual sophistication in audiences and academic analyses, there is an almost equal naiveté when it comes to sound. Consider dialogue, music, and effects from the perspectives of the writer, director, and audience, looking at the artistic and technical factors that guide and constrain the creative process. Examples will be shown from foreign and domestic feature, documentary, and animated films.

212 slots available
$145.00

Wednesday, Starts April 4

9:30am - 11:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Poetry in a Post-Nature World

Stephanie Wells

Examine the ways in which the British Romantics’ view of nature gave way to more contemporary, but perhaps less idealized ways of engaging with both the natural world and the urban city. Poets may include John Keats, William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Allen Ginsberg, Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, Mary Oliver, and Billy Collins.

46 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Current Issues before the U.S. Supreme Court (new students)

Marshall Krause

Review about 10 undecided cases now pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. Is there an exemption to anti-discrimination laws when they conflict with religious beliefs? Does gerrymandering congressional districts for political advantage violate the constitution? Can California require all pregnancy assistance centers to post information about free abortions at other facilities? Does a suspected undocumented immigrant held in custody for years awaiting a hearing have the right to release on bail? No legal experience required; Krause will provide basic information and research guidance.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Adams Family: America’s First Dynasty

Mick Chantler

The Adamses are arguably our most powerful dynasty, exercising influence over American affairs for almost two centuries. They were brilliant, learned, and witty, yet often abrasive, arrogant, and grandiose. Trace the tumultuous and controversial careers of this remarkable clan, from John and Abigail — America’s first power couple — to John Quincy, the child prodigy who followed in his father’s footsteps, diplomat Charles Francis, and Henry, the brilliant historian and journalist.

203 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Current Issues before the U.S. Supreme Court (returning)

Marshall Krause

Review about 10 undecided cases now pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. Is there an exemption to anti-discrimination laws when they conflict with religious beliefs? Does gerrymandering congressional districts for political advantage violate the constitution? Can California require all pregnancy assistance centers to post information about free abortions at other facilities? Does a suspected undocumented immigrant held in custody for years awaiting a hearing have the right to release on bail? No legal experience required; Krause will provide basic information and research guidance. This course will cover the same topics as the morning class (see above), but with advanced discussion and greater class participation.

10 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Jews, Italy, and Fascism

Francesco Spagnolo

Examine contemporary works of prose, fiction, poetry, cinema, and music by or about Italian Jews during the 20th century, focusing on Jewish intellectuals under the fascist regime between the two World Wars. With the exception of Giorgio Bassani, we will concentrate on authors from the city of Turin — Natalia Ginzburg, Carlo Levi, Primo Levi, and Vittorio Dan Segre — and on film and music based on their works.

4 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Wagner's Ring: I Saw the World End

Clifford "Kip" Cranna

Richard Wagner’s monumental four-opera cycle, The Ring of the Nibelung, will be performed at San Francisco Opera in June. Examine its long creative process and transformative operatic journey through a world unhinged by corruption, politics, greed, and neglect, where the one true power is the redeeming force of love. Discover how Wagner weaves this potent cautionary tale about the end of the world and the birth of a new order. All levels welcome.

249 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts April 5

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Caryl Churchill: The Greatest Living Playwright

Anthony Clarvoe

British playwright Caryl Churchill is known for dramatizing the abuses of power, her surrealistic style, and exploration of feminist themes. We will read and discuss five plays — Cloud Nine, Top Girls, Mad Forest, Far Away, and Here We Go/Escaped Alone.

19 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Global Lens: The International Documentary

Michael Fox

The view from abroad is revealing, refreshing, and occasionally jarring. View six films — most of which have never been screened in the United States — and discuss their aims, strategies, choices, and ethics. Examine perennial issues of nonfiction filmmaking, such as point of view, journalism versus activism, truth versus representation, the imperatives and conventions of narrative (i.e., storytelling), and aesthetic choices.

243 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

Modern Women Architects

Pierluigi Serraino

Discover key women architects who have overcome a male-dominated industry and produced groundbreaking work, including Julia Morgan, Anne Fougeron, Kayuzo Sejima, Charlotte Perriand, and Mary Ann Schicketanz. Learn about their sensibilities in dealing with design problems, their cultural referents, what makes their work distinctive, and how they see themselves in the world of modern and contemporary architecture.

152 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Controversies over Monuments and Memory

Cecilia O'Leary

“The past is never dead,” wrote William Faulkner. “It’s not even past.” Applying that to current controversies, should Confederate monuments be taken down? Should university buildings be renamed? Is it unpatriotic to protest the national anthem at sporting events? Today’s culture wars over monuments, symbols, and rituals are part of our living history and reflect the country’s deep political divide. We will discuss how institutions should handle bitterly contested issues and consider a current controversy in Berkeley.

26 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Five Personal Pieces, Part 2

Deborah Lichtman

Delve deeper into memoir by exploring theme, structure, suspense, and point of view. Each class will include lectures, readings, in-class exercises, and small-group work. Find the right balance between storytelling and disclosure. Compose impromptu pieces and receive feedback. We will begin with a renewed focus on scenes and end with tips for revision. This course follows up on themes introduced in previous terms.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Great Republics: Historical Lessons for Warding off Autocracy

Bruce Elliott

As democracy is under threat around the globe, this course will examine how history’s leading republics maintained distributed power. We will focus on Venice, history’s longest-lasting republic; the more democratic Florentine Republic; the Dutch Republic, which fostered that nation’s Golden Age; and Britain’s parliamentary system enshrining separation of powers. We will also examine the first three French Republics and the Founders’ crafting of the American constitution. Consider what measures may be required to safeguard democracy today.

228 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Mexico: a Nation's History, Culture, and Prospects, Part 2

Alex Saragoza

Starting with the political crisis of 1968, this course will encompass Mexico’s political economy, as well as trends in its popular culture, social structure, notions of femininity and masculinity, family, religion, the arts, literature, cinema, and music. Topics will include the Mexican drug trade, NAFTA, tourism, the importance of the oil/gas industry, and immigration. We will also discuss the Mexican general elections of July 2018 in light of U.S.-Mexico relations under the Trump administration.

105 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

Travel the World through Textiles

Rose Kelly

Examine historical and contemporary textile traditions from around the world. Look at the symbolism, cultural context, and techniques used in creating traditional textiles, as well as their role in today’s economy. We will focus on the textiles of Latin America, Africa, and Asia and study examples from Kelly’s collection as well as your collections.

141 slots available
$145.00

Friday, Starts April 6

10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Graphic Memoir

Janice Shapiro

The graphic memoir is situated between literature and film. As exemplified by Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Roz Chast’s Can We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, the combination of images and words strengthens and magnifies all the truths of our lives.

14 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals (morning)

Danny Neece

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. Whether you are new to watercolor or are familiar with the medium, this class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are suggested but not required — open to all levels. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals (afternoon)

Danny Neece

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. Whether you are new to watercolor or are familiar with the medium, this class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are suggested but not required — open to all levels. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$225.00

Wednesday, Starts April 18

2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

The 21st-century Gender Revolution

Diane Ehrensaft

Address radical changes in both concepts and practices of gender in Western culture, and how those changes present themselves in adults, children, their parents, and the community.

6 slots available
$185.00

Monday, Starts January 22

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Imperial China

Douglas Lee

This course will offer a comprehensive survey of Imperial Chinese history and culture, from the First Empire of the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 BCE 220 CE), through the Late Imperial China of the Ming (1368– 1644 CE) and Qing (Ch’ing, 1644–1800 CE) Dynasties. We will compare government, foreign relations, economics, and society and culture across all these periods.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

33 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
David Brower Center, Berkeley

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory

Peter Ralston

This course will describe the activities of nerve cells and how drugs or disease alter their functioning. We will discuss the organization of neuronal networks that serve major mechanisms, such as hearing and memory. We will introduce each lecture with a basic neuroscience topic, then discuss related clinical concepts. This course will contain a mix of new topics and topics covered in Ralston’s previous classes.

47 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Animals in Literature

Dorothy Gilbert

Gain a deeper awareness of how humans have made use of other animals — in thought and art, metaphor and satire — to understand ourselves. Increasingly science tells us that animals are far more like us than we thought, yet many species are disappearing. What is it to be human? What do we truly share with our fellow creatures? Why have we always been drawn to them and made them a part of our mental lives and creative expression.

21 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Life/Story: A Memoir Workshop

Tamim Ansary

This workshop is for anyone interested in writing a memoir or short memoir-based pieces. We will discuss how to get started, keep the words flowing, zero in on a story, and rediscover the forgotten. We will also explore ways to shape a narrative, invest a story with drama, humor, and suspense, and enhance the narrative with dialogue, descriptive details, and vivid language. Classes will include writing activities and discussion of your work.

2 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:15pm
David Brower Center, Berkeley

Standing on Sacred Ground

Christopher "Toby" McLeod

Why are sacred places important to indigenous people? What do the values and worldviews of aboriginal cultures hold as lessons for Western society in times of ecological collapse? How can each of us deepen our connection to nature in an authentic way? Filmmaker Christopher McLeod has spent 40 years collaborating with native people to document conflicts over sacred places. His films explore the relationship between nature and culture, how individuals of all cultures yearn for spiritual connection to nature, how mining, dams, climate change, New Age appropriation and Christian evangelism conflict with native spiritual practices. We will view McLeod’s films In the Light of Reverence (2001), the four-part Standing on Sacred Ground series (2013), and his new film Guardians of the Sacred (2017) in six sessions with Native American guests. http://sacredland.org

103 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
David Brower Center, Berkeley
Cancelled

The Dangerous Media Landscape

Beverly Crawford

Today’s media landscape is dangerous territory. Hoaxes, “clickbait” headlines, and opinion that passes for news are creating confusion, punching holes in the truth, and leading us to doubt everything branded as “news.” Hyper-partisan blogs generate more traffic on social media than real news sites. We will look at the phenomenal rise of fake news, who writes it, why people believe it, and its consequences.

4 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Search for Earth-like Planets

Warren Wiscombe

The number of likely exoplanets has grown from zero in 1990 to over 5,000 in 2017. Survey the types of exoplanets, from hot Jupiters to super-Earths; how they form; how we detect them and what we can observe; what their climates may be; what “habitable” means and which exoplanets are possibly habitable; and what the histories of Earth, Mars, and Venus tell us about possible Earthlike planets elsewhere.

44 slots available
$145.00

Tuesday, Starts January 23

10:00am - 12:30pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center -- Arts & Sciences Room, Lafayette

Dream Work and Archetypal Mythology

Barry Friedman

Dreams are vehicles to help us realize who we are and who we can become, as well as understand our relationship to the world and the divine. Learn how to work deeply with your dreams through personal sharing and response. Discuss major archetypal motifs that appear in our dreams and connect us to the world of mythology and meaning. This creative process is at once enlightening, transformative, and healing.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

French Short Stories

Caroline Smadja

This course will examine French short stories from the late 19th and 20th centuries. Colette’s “The Hand” sets a perfect example of what is now dubbed flash fiction. Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace” remains a classic to this day. In addition to Albert Camus and Françoise Sagan, we’ll also study Marcel Aymée and Anna Gavalda, lesser known by U.S. readers. Discussion questions will be available seven to 10 days in advance.

9 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley
Cancelled

Religion and World Politics

Dayna Barnes

This course will examine important religious trends, conflicts, and political events from around the world. Topics include Christianity, imperialism, and U.S. foreign policy; Islam and Arab nationalism; Hinduism and the creation of modern India; Shinto and Japanese militarism;
and Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism in political protest and national identity in Asia.

300 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Rise and Fall of World Communism in the 20th Century

George Breslauer

The rise and fall of world communism was one of the great dramas of the 20th century---born in wars (World War I, World II, Cold War), offering an alternative modernity to that of the capitalist world, and ultimately succumbing to the pressures of Cold War, capitalist globalization, over-bureaucratization, and popular disaffection. The result was either systemic collapse (the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) or a fundamental alteration of key features of the communist system (China, Vietnam). Beyond that, a few hangers-on remain: North Korea, Laos, and Cuba, while many non-ruling communist parties have transformed themselves in either a more-radical or more social-democratic direction.

135 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

The Symphonies of Gustav Mahler

Stephen Schultz

Conduct an in-depth historical survey of the 11 symphonic works of Gustav Mahler. Trace the composer’s stylistic evolution during the four stages of his creative life, and clarify the main characteristics of these periods. We will focus on form, harmonic and melodic characteristics, and programmatic and emotional content. We will also compare and contrast many different conducting styles and interpretations.

109 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

California Election 2018

Chuck McFadden

Political campaigns use a variety of strategies to move voters in a desired direction, including direct mail, commercials, rallies, and social media. Explore what goes into designing a ballot measure or candidate campaign. Review California’s gubernatorial candidates and the challenges facing each hopeful. We will occasionally divide into opposing campaign staffs on specific issues so everyone will have a chance to be a political strategist.

107 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Discover the Ottoman Empire

Douglas Brookes

The Ottoman Empire ruled most of the Middle East and Southeastern Europe for about 400 years — and its fall in 1922 helped shape the modern Middle East — yet few Americans know much about it. Discover the major historical trends that influenced the state. Investigate key aspects such as religion, the imperial family, and the harem system, and explore Ottoman language, literature, music, art, and architecture.

2 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

It’s All About the Song

Peter Elman

The essence of popular music is the song; whether it is folk, pop, rock, rhythm and blues or country, the song is the core of the popular record. This course examines the lives and work of six great songwriters/artists of the golden era of rock and roll. We will study the contributions of Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, the team of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Brian Wilson, Paul Simon and Joni Mitchell.

107 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Shakespeare Among the Moderns

Hugh Richmond

Compare six modern plays to their Shakespearean precedents: Shaw’s Pygmalion (The Taming of the Shrew); Chekhov’s Seagull (Hamlet); Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Much Ado About Nothing); Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (Hamlet); O’Neil’s The Emperor Jones (Othello); and Beckett’s Waiting for Godot (King Lear). The approach will stress performance, such as Paul Robeson as both Othello and Emperor Jones.

0 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing Children’s Picture Books

Dashka Slater

Illustrated children’s books are an enduring and unique form — but how do you go about writing one? Walk through the process from the idea to the finished manuscript. We will do weekly writing assignments and workshop them in class. This class — for experienced and beginning writers alike — will offer a minimum of fear and a maximum of fun. No illustration skills required.

1 slots available
$225.00

Wednesday, Starts January 24

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Juan Rulfo

John Campion

Gabriel Garcia Marquez said of Juan Rulfo’s works, “They add up to no more than 300 pages; but … they are as durable as the pages that have come down to us from Sophocles.” Rulfo’s masterful stories follow the existential struggles — both external and internal — of common people in revolutionary and postrevolutionary Mexico. Closely read these stories and look deeply at their context, language, and mind-boggling narration.

6 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley
Cancelled

Personal Safety and Empowerment

Christine Schoefer

It’s not uncommon to feel physically less sure of ourselves and more vulnerable as we age. Cultivate awareness in public and private situations; practice prevention and de-escalation; set and enforce your personal boundaries; and learn simple, effective physical techniques for self-defense. Each class will include discussion, journal writing, role playing, and simple movement. Appropriate for most levels of fitness.

5 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Symphony, Part 1

Alexandra Amati

Explore the first part of the “golden century of the symphony” through analysis of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and others. Learn about the musical features and formal structures of a symphony and the chronological development of the genre. Then go beyond the music to study its representation of changing social structures in central Europe in the 18th century.

138 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Bay Area documentary filmmakers expose contemporary and historical injustices at home and abroad and spotlight the work of unknown or forgotten artists and activists. Each session will feature a new or recent one-hour film followed by a candid, in-person conversation with the director. We’ll focus on the practical, financial, creative, and ethical aspects of crafting documentaries, from conception through editing to broadcast and distribution.

105 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Sex and the Supreme Court

Marshall Krause

The U.S. Constitution now protects samesex marriage, unrestricted media depiction of sexuality, unrestricted sexual activities in private, women’s right to choose in child-bearing and contraception, sexual discrimination and harassment, interracial marriage, and fluid sexual identities and equal treatment for all. Review and discuss these developments and their longrange implications.

10 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Song and Dance Men of the Silver Screen

Bonnie Weiss

Learn about the marvelous men of movie musicals who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and way with a song. Discover who was also a classical composer, who was a jazz pianist, who was a lion tamer, and who was a political activist and (closet) intellectual! Featured performers include Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Bill Bojangles Robinson, the Nicholas Brothers, and Donald O’Connor.

0 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts January 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Economics of Globalization

Joanna Moss

The first great globalization (1870–1914) brought the world economically closer together than in any earlier period. However, World War I and the Great Depression ended this extraordinary period. Today, globalization has again become central to economies worldwide. Examine the economic effects of globalization on international trade, international labor migration, the international monetary system and economic integration, and global economic crises.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

The Golden Age of Russian Culture

Elena Sheygal-Placzek

The Golden Age of Russian culture embraced most of the 19th century. Explore the intertwining of literature, music, art, and folklore within the context of historical and cultural factors, such as the quest for national identity, a peculiar amalgam of aristocratic and peasant culture, and the Russian value system and mentality. Meet the poet Pushkin, composer Glinka, painter Levitan, and other lesser-known artists.

72 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Understanding Astrobiology

Margaret Race

This course will provide an accessible overview of current space research and astrobiology missions searching for evidence of life beyond Earth. In addition to putting astrobiology science and technology in context, we’ll also discuss challenging real-world issues involving policy, ethical, theological, and societal implications of a possible discovery of ET. Far-out thinkers welcome!

238 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Asia in Focus

Darren Zook

Asia has always been a politically dynamic and culturally vibrant part of the world. Focus on six countries that have come to the forefront of global concern and interest, either because of dramatic shifts in the political and cultural landscape or because of ongoing and persistent issues that seem to defy a lasting solution. Gain a greater understanding of India, Myanmar/ Burma, Singapore, Indonesia, China, and the Korean Peninsula.

17 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Five Personal Pieces

Deborah Lichtman

Gain tools to depict a few memorable events from your life. Try your hand at sketches of people and places, scenes with action and dialogue, and passages of description and reflection. Read published excerpts to learn about literary technique, then practice through writing exercises. You’ll leave with a portfolio of five personal pieces and constructive feedback for future writing projects.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Mexico: A Nation’s History, Culture, and Prospects, Part 1

Alex Saragoza

This two-part course will encompass political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Mexico’s past and present. Part 1 (Winter 2018) will cover the period from the defeat of the Aztecs to the mass protests of 1968. Part 2 (Spring 2018) will cover 1968 to the present, including the prospects for the presidential election of July 2018. We will discuss the interface between the United States and Mexico throughout.

56 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette

The Fab Four and Rolling Stones, 1962–70

Peter Elman

In 1964, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones came, saw, and conquered the United States. We often forget that they took an American art form — rock and roll — and showed us how it could be done. Examine six phases in the history of each band, exploring how these young Brits parlayed their obsession with American music into untold fame and fortune. Look closely at why one band lasted seven years, while the other has lasted 54 years.

34 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Wisdom of Grief

Lauren Vanett,Harvey Schwartz

There is transformative potential inherent in grieving. We will explore myths and models of grief, obstacles to it, and how personal strengths can support it. Cultivate skills to support others who are grieving by increasing your self-awareness and selfcare. (Note: This class is not grief therapy and is not recommended for those who have suffered a recent loss. Contact the instructors if you’re unsure about participating.)

3 slots available
$185.00

Friday, Starts January 26

10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Memory Book

David Casuto

Create beautiful books that tell your stories and memories with printed images, photographs, and text. Learn scanning, editing, enhancing, and touching up, with the ultimate goal of adding your content to a customized online photo book. You may create your books as gifts, personal memoirs, travel journals, or family heirlooms. Bring your own laptops to class. No iPads or tablets, please.

12 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

This session will rely on drawing and sketching as you provide the unique creative approach to the medium. Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

This session will rely on drawing and sketching as you provide the unique creative approach to the medium. Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

0 slots available
$225.00