Tuesday, Starts January 21

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Building a Great Memoir

Louise Nayer

Uncover potent moments from your past through the basic elements of memoir: sensory detail, scene versus summary, dialogue, time shifts, tension, and voice. Read great memoirists to get started. Do in-class exercises and work with peers. Hand in weekly pages for comprehensive instructor feedback. Leave the class with a body of writing.

0 slots available
$235.00

History of Baroque Music

Stephen Schultz

This class will be a chronological retrospective of music from the Baroque era, covering the years 1600-1750. All major composers of instrumental and vocal music will be discussed including Monteverdi, Corelli, Vivaldi, Couperin, Handel, Telemann, Rameau, and Bach. From the birth of opera through the major works of J.S. Bach, we will analyze the styles of the three main musical centers of composition: Italy, France, and Germany.

115 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Infectious Diseases in the News

Deborah Gold

In this course we will consider infectious diseases that made history, those that are currently in the public eye, or both. We will discuss the plague, then and now; influenza from 1918 to recent strains; foodborne and healthcare related infections; and the resurgence of childhood related illnesses and the anti-vaccine movement.

21 slots available
$195.00

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Nordic Lands: Politics, Society, and Culture

Darren Zook

The Nordic lands have always followed something of a separate path from the rest of Europe, but aside from a few general reference points — the Vikings, Abba, and the much-vaunted but largely misunderstood “Nordic model” welfare state — much of what makes the Nordic lands what they are remains largely unknown. This course will explore what links all of the Nordic lands — Finland, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland — and what makes each its own unique thing.

91 slots available
$155.00

Country Rock, 1965 – Present

Peter Elman

This class will cover the historically significant country-rock movement which started in LA in 1965 and spread across the country, changing the musical landscape of popular music. We will explore how two roots-oriented genres — country music and rock and roll — borrowed from each other and merged to create a new genre which has since spawned many sub-genres, each with its own unique approach to country-rock.

78 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Plants, People, and Culture

Deepa Natarajan

Humans have utilized plants over millennia for food, fiber, shelter, medicine, art, ritual, scent, dyes, and more. Explore ethnobotany, the study of the complex relationships between people and plants, as we journey around the world looking at biocultural diversity and the ways in which people use plants in their daily lives and how this impacts current issues of conservation and transnational identity. We will also tour the UC Botanical Garden, which has a globally diverse collection of over 10,000 plants.

122 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Genocide in California’s Closet

Robert McNally

Most Californians are unaware that their state sponsored and funded a campaign to exterminate the Indigenous population — a mass atrocity known under contemporary international law as genocide. This course explores what happened in California between 1846 and 1900 and looks at how a democracy orchestrated a crime typically associated with dictatorship. It also connects California’s story with the larger United States narrative of conquest, and considers the effects upon California society, culture, and politics today.

0 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Viva Verdi! Opera and the Birth of Modern Italy

Clifford "Kip" Cranna

The leading artist of Italy’s reunification in the 19th Century was the great composer Giuseppe Verdi. His operas brought to the stage the values and issues of the “Risorgimento,” giving vivid creative expression to the ideals of his time. His stirring and melodious music provided a common bond for peoples divided by political boundaries, customs, and his personal life became symbolic of an emerging nation’s vital spirit.

198 slots available
$155.00

Wednesday, Starts January 22

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

My Life is a Poem

Devorah Major

Memories are lovely mosaics pieced together by time and circumstance. Poetry is a wonderful way to reclaim our lives in ways that ask for truth over facts, and moments over monuments. This course will provide fresh lessons for new and returning students to consider our lives through poetry. We will look at memoir poems of others, become aware of new established poets, invite you to create your own poems, and discuss and write poems in class. In session six, we will have a class poetry reading and bring in two poems for a workshop anthology.

0 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The End of Nuclear Arms Control

Paul Rockett

The threat of nuclear war has returned, both because of Russian actions on INF and US actions with Iran and North Korea. We will examine possible global futures by studying the practice of Nuclear Arms Control, its history, organization, and uses. No prior political or scientific knowledge is required.

30 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Germans in France in World War II: Occupation and Memory

Bert Gordon

We examine France’s path from victory in World War I through defeat and occupation by Nazi Germany in 1940, followed by the establishment of an authoritarian regime under World War I hero Marshal Philippe Pétain in the spa town of Vichy. We will address the experiences of collaborators and resistors, as well as Jews and others targeted by the Germans and their French supporters. Finally, we will turn to the Liberation, its aftermath and postwar purges, and consider how the Occupation has been remembered in France and elsewhere.

0 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

The Silver Age of Russian Culture

Elena Sheygal-Placzek

Russian culture at the turn of the 20th century was in a dynamic period of experimentation and outstanding discoveries in the visual, literary, and performing arts. The Silver Age produced a galaxy of brilliant artistic talents: explore the poetry of Blok and Akhmatova; the music of Stravinsky and Scriabin; the paintings of Bakst and Malevich; Diaghilev’s “Ballets Russes” enterprise. We will also discuss how the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 impacted the arts and the lives of writers, musicians, and artists.

28 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

What Economists Know About Important Policy Issues

John Haveman

Economics plays a central role in the functioning of every aspect of society, and is expressed through the actions of governments at all levels. This course will address a set of prominent policy issues in which economics is at the core, their origins as policy matters, underlying data and evidence, and policy levers. The focus will be on what the economics profession collectively understands to be true about the issue, not specific policy solutions.

225 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Nonfiction films are more essential than ever, but the subject matter typically overshadows the process for making them. In fact, the filmmaker’s narrative, thematic, and aesthetic choices are as important as the material itself. Each session will feature a recent or in-progress film followed by a candid discussion with the director. We’ll focus on the practical and ethical challenges of making documentaries, from conception through production and postproduction to distribution.

182 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Gender Spectrum

Erica Anderson

The Bay Area has been ground zero for social change in the areas of civil rights, free speech, resistance to oppression, sexual revolution, waves of feminism, and gay liberation. Now we face another dramatic revolution in understanding gender and learning how to live in a society in which gender is expressed on a spectrum. New knowledge, healthcare practices, and cultural challenges bring us into a time to learn who we are and how to build an inclusive and accepting society.

23 slots available
$195.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Why Shakespeare Matters in Today’s World

Michael Moran

This course will focus on how Shakespeare’s greatest works remain relevant in today’s socio-political context and why. Beginning with an in-depth look at Hamlet, the course will illuminate why it has inspired and vexed artists for centuries and the mysteries inherent in it that reveal the mysteries of our own nature. After Hamlet, we will focus on Othello and Macbeth in the same fashion - unearthing the paradoxes of the human condition that continue to play out in our lives today.  Lectures will include live performances.

0 slots available
$155.00

Thursday, Starts January 23

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Local Government from the Ground Up

Daren Fields

Have you ever wondered what a mayor really does? Have you ever thought about where your local tax dollars actually go? This course provides an introduction to cities, counties, school districts, and special districts. Examine how they are organized, what services they provide, and how they impact our daily lives. Discuss local and state ballot measures in the November election and their impact on local government. Learn how you can make a difference in your community.

23 slots available
$195.00

Understanding Film Through the Eyes of Immigrants

Joseph Lurie

Using selected films, we’ll explore cultural realities, clashes and misunderstandings through the eyes of Chinese, Japanese, Iranian, Sudanese and Latino Immigrants. Background readings and intercultural tools will be offered to facilitate understanding of cultures to be featured, and where possible, film makers and cultural informants will be invited as resources. We’ll conclude by highlighting attitudes about the elderly across cultures and break some stereotypes with Lives Well Lived, a film featuring inspirational stories about seniors in the United States.

120 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Van Morrison: Musical Mysticism of the Belfast Cowboy

Peter Elman

Over the past 55 years, Van Morrison has produced 40 albums. His eclectic career has ranged from the early blues-influenced days of his Irish band Them, to his acclaimed twin masterpieces, Astral Weeks and Moondance, into the 1970s, when he parlayed R&B-based rock into superstardom. Morrison has eloquently displayed an ability to move between genres, yet staying true to the twin themes of jazzy rhythm and blues and the Celtic folk of his ancestors.

213 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Bay Area Living Masters of the Short Story

Hilary Roberts

In this discussion-centered class we’ll delve into stirring creations from our rich roster of living Bay Area story writers, both known and lesser known: Joyce Carol Oates, Tommy Orange, Tobias Wolff, Molly Giles, Amy Tan, Namwali Serpell, Olga Zilberbourg, Kim Addonizio, Kara Vernor, Peter Orner, Ethel Rohan, Adam Johnson.

5 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Election 2020: Will Voters of Color Make a Difference?

Alex Saragoza

This course will examine voter turnout in light of recent patterns among three major minority groups — Latinos, Asians and African Americans — considering such things as regional variations, differences of age, class, and gender, and urban/rural permutations. We will discuss how the two major parties have addressed the role of minority voters in party platforms, campaign spending, and strategies, and will take up the debate over “voter suppression” laws and gerrymandering and their implications for communities of color.

122 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Exploring Your Identity Through Writing

Anita Amirrezvani

Your unique family, heritage, culture, and traditions offer a rich source of material. Learn how to draw on your own background to generate stories that are deeply meaningful to you, the people you love, and even to complete strangers. Writing assignments will include nonfiction and fiction. Sharing work will be encouraged but not required. Leave class with a roadmap for expanding your material.

0 slots available
$235.00

Strategy and Foreign Policy: The Use (and Misuse) of the American Military

Michael Baker

The U.S. military has been used (and misused) for the last 75 years as a foreign policy cudgel in an uneven and often inexplicable fashion. The results are embarrassing – the world’s most powerful military has not won a war in 75 years, has destroyed numerous societal systems, created millions of displaced refugees, and spawned disdain for our policies along with creating numerous enemies. We will look at case studies of American foreign policy fiascos which have eroded the image and reputation of America around the world.

92 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Jazz Piano Trio, Part 2

Jeff Denson

The piano trio is a powerful ensemble with a rich history. We will examine six groundbreaking performers that helped to establish the piano trio as a permanent fixture in jazz: swinging pianists Erol Garner and Wynton Kelly, members of the first Miles Davis Quartet in the 1950’s; McCoy Tyner, a member of the John Coltrane Quartet; the ever ever-adventurous Herbie Hancock; and the passionate virtuosity of Keith Jarrett and Chick Corea.  Students need not have taken the Jazz Piano, Part 1 to fully engage with this class.  

211 slots available
$155.00

Friday, Starts January 24

(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

The Nordic Lands: Politics, Society, and Culture - ONLINE ONLY

Darren Zook

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 03/13/2020.   The Nordic lands have always followed something of a separate path from the rest of Europe, but aside from a few general reference points — the Vikings, Abba, and the much-vaunted but largely misunderstood “Nordic model” welfare state — much of what makes the Nordic lands what they are remains largely unknown. This course will explore what links all of the Nordic lands — Finland, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland — and what makes each its own unique thing.

344 slots available
$120.00
(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

What Economists Know About Important Policy Issues - ONLINE ONLY

John Haveman

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 03/13/2020.   Economics plays a central role in the functioning of every aspect of society, and is expressed through the actions of governments at all levels. This course will address a set of prominent policy issues in which economics is at the core, their origins as policy matters, underlying data and evidence, and policy levers. The focus will be on what the economics profession collectively understands to be true about the issue, not specific policy solutions.

364 slots available
$120.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Drawing Fundamentals

Danny Neece

Explore the key elements of drawing, including line, shape, tone, compositional design, and the drawing field. Learn how to creatively establish relationships, proportion, and the illusory third dimension, and touch on different modes of abstraction. We will address the role of drawing in imagination, invention, and image development. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you can develop a free and fluent command of the drawing process and a conceptual understanding of key principles.

0 slots available
$235.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Digital Photography

Berkeley Art Studio

Move beyond the automatic settings of your digital SLR camera and start creating works of art. Learn about the photographic process, including exposure, composition, lighting, and subject matter, and share your work with the class. Participants should have a basic understanding of how their camera works and how to retrieve photos from it. A digital SLR or digital point-and-shoot camera that changes shutter speed and aperture is required.

0 slots available
$235.00

Monday, Starts January 27

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Approaches to Nature, Landscape, and Gardens

Achva Stein

Our assumptions about nature, landscape and gardens have consequences that affect the health of our physical environment and contribute to the decline of ecosystems. Design forms seen in landscapes and gardens reflect our attitudes regarding the exploitation of natural resources and the socio-economic systems of the societies inhabiting the land. By reframing the way in which we observe what we see, we can infuse more coherent and appropriate meanings into the actions we take working on and with the land.

28 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Modern China in Global Context

Lanchih Po

This course emphasizes China’s national history as a part of the global process from the 19th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to China’s links to transnational migration, trade, and investment throughout the history of Western colonization, the Pacific War and the Cold War, and socialism and post-socialism. China has experienced complex metamorphoses in both its internal economy and governance, as well as with its relations within the region and the world.

3 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

History of San Francisco Bay Area Buildings

Linda Day

The course is divided into three periods and examines commercial and industrial buildings as well as residential buildings: 1846-1906, The Age of Mineral Extraction; 1906-1946, The San Francisco Earthquake to World War II; 1947-present: Skyscrapers and Track Homes. We will examine the materials used in each of these periods, the buildings that arose from them and the cultural shifts they reflected and reinforced.

0 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Toni Morrison, American Treasure

Stephanie Wells

Toni Morrison was one of our greatest novelists. Her treatments of race, gender, and above all, humanity and love in America, were matched only by her ability to craft a sentence stunning enough to knock you to the ground. This course will focus on a small selection of Morrison’s most important novels, as well as some of her critical writings.

0 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

When Italy Meets America

Margherita Ghetti

At the turn of the 20th century, Italian people came in waves to North American shores, carrying along their families, goods, and language. Cinema lent itself to the representation of this encounter: exploring the imagery of the “American Dream” as well as challenging it. This course will also give us a chance to investigate the stereotype of Italian-Americans as gangsters, tracing a historical arc up to big, award-winning Italian films packaged for the viewing pleasure of U.S. audiences.

29 slots available
$155.00

Monday, Starts February 3

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

First class meets February 3, 2020. Class is 5 Weeks. Final class meets March 9, 2020.

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five-part songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

64 slots available
$155.00

Monday, Starts September 23

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Art Since 1945: A World of New Meanings

Simon Kenrick

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/18

This course offers a moving picture of the arts since WWII—an international and intercultural sequence of shifting ideas and images that have questioned the nature of art. New voices, symbols, and languages have emerged—women, people of color, and LGBTQ artists have challenged traditional meanings—bringing new richness and complexity to the world of art. This course explores these volatile and conflictive histories.

0 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/04

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

32 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Legacy Letters

Sara Orem

**NOTE** Final class meeting date TBD

Also called an ethical will, the legacy letter began as a Jewish practice over 3000 years ago. It shares values, stories, and hopes with loved ones. It can be a one- page letter or a collection of short written pieces, photos, and official documents; or something in between. In this class, you will write the foundation of a legacy letter and will share your writing only if you wish to. No writing experience is required.

1 slots available
$235.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

America in the Sixties: The Protest Movements

Bill Smoot

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/04

This course will study the protest movements of the sixties: civil rights, black power, student, counter-culture, and anti-war, as well as the beginnings of the women’s and the ecology movements. We will explore the successes and failures of these efforts and discuss their long and short-term impact on the direction of American society. We will also consider the challenges of "doing history" as an intellectual discipline.

14 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Buddhism, Daoism, and Mindfulness

Davina Chan

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/04

This course explores Buddhist and Daoist meditation practices and ways in which they can be used to work with the mind and emotions to enhance physical and psychological well-being. Participants will gain an understanding of the views and practices of Buddhist and Daoist schools of meditation. The course will also include an examination of current neuropsychological and clinical research on effects of mindfulness and meditation.

1 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Current Controversies in Research, Health & Nutrition

Ed Blonz

This course provides a survey of contemporary controversies in public health. It covers the use and abuse of the media as a communicator of science; foibles inherent in the publication of research; and health fraud and misinformation, including diets and dietary supplements. Common underlying themes in health issues such as weight and mobility, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cognitive decline will also be discussed.

1 slots available
$120.00

Tuesday, Starts September 24

9:30am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley
Note change in time

Renoir in the '30s

Michael Fox

Jean Renoir, called the greatest filmmaker in the world by Orson Welles and François Truffaut, produced a remarkable body of work in the 1930s — including the still-innovative La Chienne and the reviled and rediscovered The Rules of the Game — encompassing melodrama, social realism, tragicomedy, historical epic, and farce. This lecture and screening class explores the genius and contradictions of a humanist who combined effortless artistry with social critique.

169 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$235.00

Social Media Risks

Roy Ulrich

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/05 will be held in the Arts & Science Center and NOT in Community Hall.

Social media are compatible with authoritarianism, and indeed are proving to be among its most effective enablers. The “echo chamber” creates the perfect environment for the spread of fake news, conspiracy theories, and rumors. As troubling as the implications of social media's pathologies may be, there can be no hope of meaningful reform unless we address them squarely.

124 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

U.S. Contemporary Short Story Writers

Caroline Smadja

This course, designed around group discussion, focuses on six US-born short-story writers who are widely published, yet not necessarily “household names.” Each class will center on a specific author. Participants will be asked to analyze stories in terms of theme, meaning, point of view, and other considerations, following a list of study questions available seven to 10 days in advance. Authors may include Stuart Dybeck, Lorrie Moore, and George Saunders.

0 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Memphis Soul

Peter Elman

The sound that came out of Memphis in the 1960’s transformed the landscape of popular music. It was rhythm and blues; it was rock and roll. It was the sound of the Deep South, the incredible voices that came from the black church, and the rhythms of the land. In this class we will explore the evolution of Stax-Volt records, the artistry of Otis Redding, Booker T. and the MGs, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, and many others.

89 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory, Part 3

Peter Ralston

This course describes the activities of nerve cells and how their functioning is altered by drugs or disease. We will discuss the organization of neuronal networks in the brain that serve major mechanisms, such as sleep, epilepsy, and consciousness. Each lecture will begin with an introduction to a basic neuroscience topic, and be followed by a discussion of related clinical concepts. The goal of the course is to enable students to better understand the functions of their own brains. There is no prerequisite for the course.

72 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette
Cancelled

The Book of Exodus: Up from Slavery

Mark McVann

Exodus is the story of the emergence of Israel as a people with a history and law. We will examine this foundational epic with an eye to the historical, literary, and ritual concerns in the texts. We will explore the significance of Moses, the Passover, the desert trek, and the Ten Commandments; examine Exodus as a model for Israelite pilgrimages to the Jerusalem Temple, and analyze its influence on the stories of Jesus' last days in Jerusalem.  The course finishes with a reading of A Different Drummer, by William Melvin Kelley.

159 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Wisdom of Grief

Lauren Vanett

There is transformative potential inherent in grieving. We will explore myths and models of grief, obstacles to it, and how personal strengths can support it. The class will help to cultivate skills that can support those who are grieving by increasing self-awareness and self-care. Note: This class is not grief therapy and is not recommended for those who have suffered a recent loss. Contact the instructor if you are unsure about participating.

21 slots available
$195.00

Wednesday, Starts September 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Neuroplasticity, Meditation, and Volunteering

Amelia Barili

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/06

Meditation and volunteering are good for your heart, brain, and whole being. Combined, they foster positive neuroplasticity. In this class, we will study the science of neuroplasticity and meditate to expand our minds and hearts. In addition, students will volunteer for one to two hours each week at English-in-Action, International House, or Refugee Transitions. Through experiential learning, students will deepen their knowledge of other cultures and help international students, refugees, and immigrants in the challenging transition to American life.

2 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Silicon Valley: Its Architecture and Urban Realm

Pierluigi Serraino

**NOTE** 10/23 and 10/30 class meetings will be from 10am - 1pm

Silicon Valley occupies a special place in the global imagination. It is the epicenter of unbridled entrepreneurship and the object of fables of infinite wealth. This class will consider how financial and human resources are mobilized in Silicon Valley, and how the legal framework of intellectual property rights and the stock market impinge on its urban form and individual buildings.

6 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Toni Morrison, National Treasure

Stephanie Wells

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/06

Toni Morrison is our greatest living novelist. Her treatments of race, gender, and above all, humanity and love in America, are matched only by her ability to craft a sentence stunning enough to knock you to the ground. This course will focus on a small selection of Morrison’s most important novels, from the beginning of her career to the present, as well as some of her critical writings.

0 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Your Brain and Your Mind on Plants and Drugs

David Presti

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/06

For millennia, humans have cultivated deep relationships with psychoactive plants and fungi – relationships embedded within and guided by ritual frameworks honoring the powers of these organisms as allies. As cultures have evolved, so also have these relationships. Ranging over coffee, chocolate, tobacco, cannabis, opium, wine, absinthe, psychedelic mushrooms, and psychiatric medications, we will explore the history and current science related to how psychoactive substances impact the mind and body.

202 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Artful Essays for Pleasure and Publication

Elizabeth Fishel

Learn how to turn your opinions, memories, and ideas into short, shapely works for pleasure or publication. Examine excellent essays by Joan Didion, Anne Lamott, Oliver Sacks, and Nora Ephron, among others. Gain practical tips on style, structure, scene setting, and creating a narrative arc. In-class prompts will kickstart opinion pieces, first-person and travel essays, and blog posts. Receive thoughtful feedback on your work and guidance on where to publish.

1 slots available
$235.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Opera

Alexandra Amati

**Faculty is unavailable for make-up class. Please enjoy one Freight & Salvage class of your choice remaining in our Fall 2019 term.

This course presents the operas in the fall 2019 season of the San Francisco Opera company, plus a preview of two that will be featured in the summer 2020 season. We will contextualize the composition and creation of the works, discuss the issues they present, and analyze how the combination of music and text delivers content. The course is appropriate and informative (and, hopefully, fun) for people actually attending the opera as well as for any curious learner

210 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley

Rural California: Political Economy and Social Character

Alex Saragoza

**Faculty is unavailable for make-up class. Please enjoy one Freight & Salvage class of your choice remaining in our Fall 2019 term.

This course examines rural California by exploring the San Joaquin Valley in contrast to the highly urbanized metro regions of Los Angeles and the Bay Area. After an overview of the rural sections of the state, the course focuses on the Central Valley: a region that leans strongly toward the GOP, has been economically based in agriculture, and has undergone major demographic and social changes.

96 slots available
$155.00

Thursday, Starts September 26

Autobiography: De/constructing the Self

Rachel Richardson

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/07

We all have stories to tell, but how do we tell them? In an age of selfies, do audiences assume there is such a thing as authenticity? What does or could autobiography mean in the post-modern world? These are some of the questions we will explore through readings and class discussions as we work towards writing our own autobiographies.

1 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Global Hotspots, Part 2

Darren Zook

So many things change in the world of international politics from one year to the next. This course will look at areas of instability and concern that have emerged or re-emerged in the past year. Each week, we will examine a different case study in depth, examining the causes and impacts of crises in countries including Sri Lanka, Somalia, Yemen, Venezuela, South Africa, and the Philippines.

71 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

4 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Sacred Mountains

Edwin Bernbaum

From the Sierra Nevada to the Himalayas, mountains have an extraordinary power to evoke wonder, awe, and a sense of the sacred. Drawing on research for his award-winning book Sacred Mountains of the World and his work with national parks and world heritage sites. Edwin Bernbaum will explore the importance and symbolism of mountains in the mythologies, religions, history, literature, and art in cultures around the world. The course focuses on the key role that mountains play in inspiring environmental conservation and spiritual growth.

2 slots available
$195.00

The Golden Age of San Francisco Rock

Richie Unterberger

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/07

In the mid-to-late 1960s, the San Francisco Bay Area exploded with psychedelic rock that captured the imagination of the world, creating legendary music that endures and influences popular culture to this day. The San Francisco Sound will be explored in depth via common and rare audio recordings by greats like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, and Santana. We'll also investigate how the Bay Area's counterculture created a scene in which experimental and idiosyncratic rock music could flower.

110 slots available
$155.00

Great Dancers and Choreographers

Kathryn Roszak

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/07

Learn how great dancers and choreographers transform the arts and our view of the world. In this class, we will consider dancers such as Rudolf Nureyev; Broadway and film legends such as Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Agnes DeMille; and choreographers such as Paul Taylor and Twyla Tharp. We will also consider leading dance artists of today, including Antonio Gades, Robert Battle, Michelle Dorrance, Cathy Marston, Suzanne Farrell, Wendy Whelan, and Misty Copeland.

98 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Rabindranath Tagore and Universal Humanism

Abhijeet Paul

Rabindranath Tagore, the first Asian Nobel Laureate in Literature (1913), left a vast legacy in Indian and world literature and cinema, culture, politics, and thought. In this course we will explore Tagore's universal humanism through selections from his massive oeuvre, including poetry, songs, plays, fiction, and essays on a wide variety of subjects such as education, anti-imperialism, pacifism, gender, and the philosophy of science.

2 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The American Revolution: An English Perspective

Mick Chantler

As Americans, we normally view the upheaval of 1776 through the eyes of our national heroes—Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, etc. But we must never forget that the Revolution was a critical milestone in British history as well. What did our countrymen across the Atlantic make of the wild and tumultuous events transpiring in the colonies? What were the effects of the decision to quash our independence?

55 slots available
$155.00

Friday, Starts September 27

(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

Global Hotspots, Part 2 - ONLINE ONLY

Darren Zook

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 12/31/2019.  So many things change in the world of international politics from one year to the next. This course will look at areas of instability and concern that have emerged or re-emerged in the past year. Each week, we will examine a different case study in depth, examining the causes and impacts of crises in countries including Sri Lanka, Somalia, Yemen, Venezuela, South Africa, and the Philippines.

439 slots available
$120.00
(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

The American Revolution: An English Perspective - ONLINE ONLY

Mick Chantler

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 12/31/2019. As Americans, we normally view the upheaval of 1776 through the eyes of our national heroes—Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, etc. But we must never forget that the Revolution was a critical milestone in British history as well. What did our countrymen across the Atlantic make of the wild and tumultuous events transpiring in the colonies? What were the effects of the decision to quash our independence? 

443 slots available
$120.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

Danny Neece

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/08

Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

2 slots available
$235.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals

Berkeley Art Studio

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/08

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. This class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are helpful but not required. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

1 slots available
$235.00

Wednesday, Starts October 2

2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Mark Jordan

**NOTE** Final class meeting on 11/13 at the California Jazz Conservatory

In 1803, Thomas Jefferson appointed his private secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an expedition to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Lewis, joined by William Clark, followed the Missouri River to its source where, it was assumed, the Columbia River would lead them quickly to the Pacific Ocean. Read the words of the explorers and see the expedition through their eyes. Learn about their adventures, challenges, and the region’s seemingly limitless wildlife. Discover how this expedition radically altered assumptions about geography.

2 slots available
$155.00