Monday, Starts September 23

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Art Since 1945: A World of New Meanings

Simon Kenrick

This course offers a moving picture of the arts since WWII—an international and intercultural sequence of shifting ideas and images that have questioned the nature of art. New voices, symbols, and languages have emerged—women, people of color, and LGBTQ artists have challenged traditional meanings—bringing new richness and complexity to the world of art. This course explores these volatile and conflictive histories.

1 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

53 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Legacy Letters

Sara Orem

Also called an ethical will, the legacy letter began as a Jewish practice over 3000 years ago. It shares values, stories, and hopes with loved ones. It can be a one- page letter or a collection of short written pieces, photos, and official documents; or something in between. In this class, you will write the foundation of a legacy letter and will share your writing only if you wish to. No writing experience is required.

0 slots available
$235.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

America in the Sixties: The Protest Movements

Bill Smoot

This course will study the protest movements of the sixties: civil rights, black power, student, counter-culture, and anti-war, as well as the beginnings of the women’s and the ecology movements. We will explore the successes and failures of these efforts and discuss their long and short-term impact on the direction of American society. We will also consider the challenges of "doing history" as an intellectual discipline.

31 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Buddhism, Daoism, and Mindfulness

Davina Chan

This course explores Buddhist and Daoist meditation practices and ways in which they can be used to work with the mind and emotions to enhance physical and psychological well-being. Participants will gain an understanding of the views and practices of Buddhist and Daoist schools of meditation. The course will also include an examination of current neuropsychological and clinical research on effects of mindfulness and meditation.

0 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Current Controversies in Research, Health & Nutrition

Ed Blonz

This course provides a survey of contemporary controversies in public health. It covers the use and abuse of the media as a communicator of science; foibles inherent in the publication of research; and health fraud and misinformation, including diets and dietary supplements. Common underlying themes in health issues such as weight and mobility, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cognitive decline will also be discussed.

27 slots available
$120.00

Tuesday, Starts September 24

9:30am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley
Note change in time

Renoir in the '30s

Michael Fox

Jean Renoir, called the greatest filmmaker in the world by Orson Welles and François Truffaut, produced a remarkable body of work in the 1930s — including the still-innovative La Chienne and the reviled and rediscovered The Rules of the Game — encompassing melodrama, social realism, tragicomedy, historical epic, and farce. This lecture and screening class explores the genius and contradictions of a humanist who combined effortless artistry with social critique.

208 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$235.00

Social Media Risks

Roy Ulrich

Social media are compatible with authoritarianism, and indeed are proving to be among its most effective enablers. The “echo chamber” creates the perfect environment for the spread of fake news, conspiracy theories, and rumors. As troubling as the implications of social media's pathologies may be, there can be no hope of meaningful reform unless we address them squarely.

133 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

U.S. Contemporary Short Story Writers

Caroline Smadja

This course, designed around group discussion, focuses on six US-born short-story writers who are widely published, yet not necessarily “household names.” Each class will center on a specific author. Participants will be asked to analyze stories in terms of theme, meaning, point of view, and other considerations, following a list of study questions available seven to 10 days in advance. Authors may include Stuart Dybeck, Lorrie Moore, and George Saunders.

0 slots available
$195.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Memphis Soul

Peter Elman

The sound that came out of Memphis in the 1960’s transformed the landscape of popular music. It was rhythm and blues; it was rock and roll. It was the sound of the Deep South, the incredible voices that came from the black church, and the rhythms of the land. In this class we will explore the evolution of Stax-Volt records, the artistry of Otis Redding, Booker T. and the MGs, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, and many others.

179 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory, Part 3

Peter Ralston

This course describes the activities of nerve cells and how their functioning is altered by drugs or disease. We will discuss the organization of neuronal networks in the brain that serve major mechanisms, such as sleep, epilepsy, and consciousness. Each lecture will begin with an introduction to a basic neuroscience topic, and be followed by a discussion of related clinical concepts. The goal of the course is to enable students to better understand the functions of their own brains. There is no prerequisite for the course.

96 slots available
$155.00

The Book of Exodus: Up from Slavery

Mark McVann

Exodus is the story of the emergence of Israel as a people with a history and law. We will examine this foundational epic with an eye to the historical, literary, and ritual concerns in the texts. We will explore the significance of Moses, the Passover, the desert trek, and the Ten Commandments; examine Exodus as a model for Israelite pilgrimages to the Jerusalem Temple, and analyze its influence on the stories of Jesus' last days in Jerusalem.  The course finishes with a reading of A Different Drummer, by William Melvin Kelley.

127 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

The Wisdom of Grief

Lauren Vanett

There is transformative potential inherent in grieving. We will explore myths and models of grief, obstacles to it, and how personal strengths can support it. The class will help to cultivate skills that can support those who are grieving by increasing self-awareness and self-care. Note: This class is not grief therapy and is not recommended for those who have suffered a recent loss. Contact the instructor if you are unsure about participating.

27 slots available
$195.00

Wednesday, Starts September 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Neuroplasticity, Meditation, and Volunteering

Amelia Barili

Meditation and volunteering are good for your heart, brain, and whole being. Combined, they foster positive neuroplasticity. In this class, we will study the science of neuroplasticity and meditate to expand our minds and hearts.

0 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Silicon Valley: Its Architecture and Urban Realm

Pierluigi Serraino

Silicon Valley occupies a special place in the global imagination. It is the epicenter of unbridled entrepreneurship and the object of fables of infinite wealth. This class will consider how financial and human resources are mobilized in Silicon Valley, and how the legal framework of intellectual property rights and the stock market impinge on its urban form and individual buildings.

14 slots available
$195.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Toni Morrison, National Treasure

Stephanie Wells

Toni Morrison is our greatest living novelist. Her treatments of race, gender, and above all, humanity and love in America, are matched only by her ability to craft a sentence stunning enough to knock you to the ground. This course will focus on a small selection of Morrison’s most important novels, from the beginning of her career to the present, as well as some of her critical writings.

0 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Your Brain and Your Mind on Plants and Drugs

David Presti

For millennia, humans have cultivated deep relationships with psychoactive plants and fungi – relationships embedded within and guided by ritual frameworks honoring the powers of these organisms as allies. As cultures have evolved, so also have these relationships. Ranging over coffee, chocolate, tobacco, cannabis, opium, wine, absinthe, psychedelic mushrooms, and psychiatric medications, we will explore the history and current science related to how psychoactive substances impact the mind and body.

239 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Artful Essays for Pleasure and Publication

Elizabeth Fishel

Learn how to turn your opinions, memories, and ideas into short, shapely works for pleasure or publication. Examine excellent essays by Joan Didion, Anne Lamott, Oliver Sacks, and Nora Ephron, among others. Gain practical tips on style, structure, scene setting, and creating a narrative arc. In-class prompts will kickstart opinion pieces, first-person and travel essays, and blog posts. Receive thoughtful feedback on your work and guidance on where to publish.

0 slots available
$235.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Opera

Alexandra Amati

This course presents the operas in the fall 2019 season of the San Francisco Opera company, plus a preview of two that will be featured in the summer 2020 season. We will contextualize the composition and creation of the works, discuss the issues they present, and analyze how the combination of music and text delivers content. The course is appropriate and informative (and, hopefully, fun) for people actually attending the opera as well as for any curious learner

245 slots available
$155.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley

Rural California: Political Economy and Social Character

Alex Saragoza

This course examines rural California by exploring the San Joaquin Valley in contrast to the highly urbanized metro regions of Los Angeles and the Bay Area. After an overview of the rural sections of the state, the course focuses on the Central Valley: a region that leans strongly toward the GOP, has been economically based in agriculture, and has undergone major demographic and social changes.

137 slots available
$155.00

Thursday, Starts September 26

Autobiography: De/constructing the Self

Stephanie Kay

We all have stories to tell, but how do we tell them? In an age of selfies, do audiences assume there is such a thing as authenticity? What does or could autobiography mean in the post-modern world? These are some of the questions we will explore through readings and class discussions as we work towards writing our own autobiographies.

0 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Global Hotspots, Part 2

Darren Zook

So many things change in the world of international politics from one year to the next. This course will look at areas of instability and concern that have emerged or re-emerged in the past year. Each week, we will examine a different case study in depth, examining the causes and impacts of crises in countries including Sri Lanka, Somalia, Yemen, Venezuela, South Africa, and the Philippines.

78 slots available
$155.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$235.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Sacred Mountains

Edwin Bernbaum

From the Sierra Nevada to the Himalayas, mountains have an extraordinary power to evoke wonder, awe, and a sense of the sacred. Drawing on research for his award-winning book Sacred Mountains of the World and his work with national parks and world heritage sites. Edwin Bernbaum will explore the importance and symbolism of mountains in the mythologies, religions, history, literature, and art in cultures around the world. The course focuses on the key role that mountains play in inspiring environmental conservation and spiritual growth.

15 slots available
$195.00

The Golden Age of San Francisco Rock

Richie Unterberger

In the mid-to-late 1960s, the San Francisco Bay Area exploded with psychedelic rock that captured the imagination of the world, creating legendary music that endures and influences popular culture to this day. The San Francisco Sound will be explored in depth via common and rare audio recordings by greats like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, and Santana. We'll also investigate how the Bay Area's counterculture created a scene in which experimental and idiosyncratic rock music could flower.

133 slots available
$155.00

Great Dancers and Choreographers

Kathryn Roszak

Learn how great dancers and choreographers transform the arts and our view of the world. In this class, we will consider dancers such as Rudolf Nureyev; Broadway and film legends such as Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, and Agnes DeMille; and choreographers such as Paul Taylor and Twyla Tharp. We will also consider leading dance artists of today, including Antonio Gades, Robert Battle, Michelle Dorrance, Cathy Marston, Suzanne Farrell, Wendy Whelan, and Misty Copeland.

119 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Rabindranath Tagore and Universal Humanism

Abhijeet Paul

Rabindranath Tagore, the first Asian Nobel Laureate in Literature (1913), left a vast legacy in Indian and world literature and cinema, culture, politics, and thought. In this course we will explore Tagore's universal humanism through selections from his massive oeuvre, including poetry, songs, plays, fiction, and essays on a wide variety of subjects such as education, anti-imperialism, pacifism, gender, and the philosophy of science.

135 slots available
$155.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The American Revolution: An English Perspective

Mick Chantler

As Americans, we normally view the upheaval of 1776 through the eyes of our national heroes—Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, etc. But we must never forget that the Revolution was a critical milestone in British history as well. What did our countrymen across the Atlantic make of the wild and tumultuous events transpiring in the colonies? What were the effects of the decision to quash our independence?

92 slots available
$155.00

Friday, Starts September 27

(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

Global Hotspots, Part 2 - ONLINE ONLY

Darren Zook

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 12/31/2019.  So many things change in the world of international politics from one year to the next. This course will look at areas of instability and concern that have emerged or re-emerged in the past year. Each week, we will examine a different case study in depth, examining the causes and impacts of crises in countries including Sri Lanka, Somalia, Yemen, Venezuela, South Africa, and the Philippines.

461 slots available
$120.00
(All day) - (All day)
ONLINE COURSE, Course Materials

The American Revolution: An English Perspective - ONLINE ONLY

Mick Chantler

This course can be viewed each week via ZOOM. The links to the video will post in Course Materials on Fridays at 5:00pm and will remain available until 12/31/2019. As Americans, we normally view the upheaval of 1776 through the eyes of our national heroes—Washington, Jefferson, John Adams, etc. But we must never forget that the Revolution was a critical milestone in British history as well. What did our countrymen across the Atlantic make of the wild and tumultuous events transpiring in the colonies? What were the effects of the decision to quash our independence? 

472 slots available
$120.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

Danny Neece

Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

0 slots available
$235.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals

Berkeley Art Studio

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. This class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are helpful but not required. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$235.00

Wednesday, Starts October 2

2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

Mark Jordan

In 1803, Thomas Jefferson appointed his private secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an expedition to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Lewis, joined by William Clark, followed the Missouri River to its source where, it was assumed, the Columbia River would lead them quickly to the Pacific Ocean. Read the words of the explorers and see the expedition through their eyes. Learn about their adventures, challenges, and the region’s seemingly limitless wildlife. Discover how this expedition radically altered assumptions about geography.

0 slots available
$155.00

Monday, Starts April 1

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Islamic Cultures and the West

Simon Kenrick

The course examines the history of relations between the Islamic world and the West via art history and visual culture. Its aim is to put Islamophobia in historical perspective— from the birth of Islam through the 1453 conquest of Constantinople to the impact of 19th century European colonialism. We will see that, aside from tensions, the history of art and visual culture contains countless examples of dialogue and mutual influence.

2 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

37 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Literature and Film of the Weimar Republic

Marion Gerlind

In this interactive seminar we will read and reflect on literature as well as watch and discuss films of the Weimar Republic (1919–33). We will explore some of the period’s most popular works: Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s musical play The Threepenny Opera; Irmgard Keun’s bestseller The Artificial Silk Girl; Leontine Sagan’s classic film Girls in Uniform; Joseph von Sternberg’s original film The Blue Angel; as well as poetry by Else Lasker-Schüler, Gertrud Kolmar, and Mascha Kaléko.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Our Life and Times: A Memoir Writing Workshop

Tamim Ansary

In this workshop, we’ll use the public events of our times as prompts for crafting stories about our own lives. Wars, assassinations, elections, social movements, turning points, transformative inventions, epochal moments in sports, music, arts, and entertainment— all of us have lived personal lives threaded through a public landscape. We will use writing as a vehicle for exploring our lives and the times we’ve lived through.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Tragedy and the Meaning of Life

Bill Smoot

Tragedy seems rooted, as Lukacs wrote, in “the deepest longing of human existence.” This course focuses on three questions: What is the essence of tragedy? What explains the value, meaning, appeal, and pleasure of contemplating literary works that are sad? In what way do tragic works suggest a stance on being or a philosophy of life? Examine five tragic works, and three philosophers—Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche—who meditated on these questions about tragedy.

5 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Travel the World Through Textiles

Rose Kelly

Examine historical and contemporary textile traditions from around the world. Look at the symbolism, cultural context, and techniques used in creating traditional textiles, as well as their role in today’s economy. We will focus on the textiles of Latin America, Africa, and Asia and study examples from Kelly’s collection as well as your collections.

1 slots available
$145.00

Tuesday, Starts April 2

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Architectural Expression: The Root of Design Style

Pierluigi Serraino

What is the difference between style and architectural expression? Explore this central question by considering building exteriors and interiors as well as product designs. Learn to read a space through its architectural expression by engaging the writings of the masters of past, modern, and contemporary eras to apprehend what Le Corbusier called “the fundamental joys of architecture.”

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Dreamwork and Archetypal Mythology

Barry Friedman

Dreams are vehicles to help us realize who we are and who we can become, as well as understand our relationship to the world and the divine. Learn how to work deeply with your dreams through personal sharing and response. Discuss major archetypal motifs that appear in our dreams and connect us to the world of mythology and meaning. This creative process is at once enlightening, transformative, and healing.

9 slots available
$225.00

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center -- Arts & Sciences Room, Lafayette
Note change in location

Iranian Cinema

Hossein Khosrowjah

Gain an overview of post-revolutionary Iranian national cinema, which has garnered international popularity and critical acclaim since the late 1980s for being innovative, ethical, and compassionate. Look at the work of contemporary filmmakers such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beyzaii, and Asghar Farhadi. Discuss the role of censorship and the strong feminist tendencies of many contemporary Iranian films.

28 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Rock 'n' Roll Road Trip, Part 2

Peter Elman

Take a chronological and geographic road trip across several American regions where key musical movements sprung up between 1965 and 1975. We’ll also explore one rock ’n’ roll legend’s masterworks. Presented as a cultural and musical journey, the course will weave together lectures, photographs, recorded music, film clips, Q&A sessions, and live music.

120 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Dazzling Dames of Broadway

Bonnie Weiss

Examine the lives of some of Broadway’s most celebrated leading ladies. Delve into the triumphs, tragedies, regrets, and joys of their personal lives. We will discuss Ethel Merman, Mary Martin, Julie Andrews, Carol Channing, Gwen Verdon, and Bernadette Peters, as well as more recent leading ladies of Broadway, such as Patti Lupone, Kristin Chenoweth, and Audra McDonald.

92 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Exploring Your Identity Through Writing

Anita Amirrezvani

Your unique family, heritage, culture, and traditions offer a rich source of material. Learn how to draw on your own background to generate stories that are deeply meaningful to you, the people you love, and even to complete strangers. Writing assignments will include nonfiction and fiction. Sharing work will be encouraged but not required. Leave class with a roadmap for expanding your material.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Expanded Self

Lauren Vanett

This course is an opportunity to appreciate who you are and who you would like to be. Reflect on past challenges and successes, cultivate self-compassion, and envision your best possible future. This hands-on journey uses mindfulness meditation and evidence- based practices from positive psychology, builds awareness of how to move beyond self-limiting beliefs, and exposes hidden capacities that you can use to activate your inner and outer life.

2 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Magic of Mozart: Adventures in Operatic Elegance

Clifford "Kip" Cranna

Explore Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s operatic genius. View his works in their historical contexts and consider Mozart’s gift for capturing the full spectrum of human nature. Examine his early influences, follow his career, and explore his most famous works, including The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and The Magic Flute, as well as lesser-known gems. No previous opera background required. Just watch, listen, and enjoy.

117 slots available
$145.00

U.S./Mexico Relations from Reagan to Trump

Alex Saragoza

Examine the relationship between the U.S. and Mexico from the Reagan presidency (1980-1988) to the present. Emphasis will be given to the current state of that relationship in light of the election of a reformist, leftof-center Mexican president in November 2018 and the Trump administration. We will discuss the border, immigration, NAFTA, the drug trade, Central American migration, energy and transnational cultural flows, as well as other related topics.

65 slots available
$145.00

Wednesday, Starts April 3

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Current Issues Before the U.S. Supreme Court

Marshall Krause

Review undecided cases now pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. Is there an exemption to anti-discrimination laws when they conflict with religious beliefs? Does gerrymandering congressional districts for political advantage violate the constitution? Does a suspected undocumented immigrant have the right to release on bail? Note: This course relies on class participation and is ideal for students who have taken a previous class with Krause or who have legal experience.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

International Women Film Directors

Linda Lau

This course examines films directed by women from different cultures and backgrounds. Each week focuses on one director and one film. Throughout the course, we will address the following questions: What types of oppression do women experience and how is this portrayed in film? How do female directors subvert traditional gender roles? What role do women directors play in changing the idea of culture?

40 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Poetry on the Ivories: Romantic Piano Music

Alexandra Amati

Explore the Romantic phenomenon of the miniature or “character” piano piece. Learn about genres and forms, codes, interpretations, and covert political implications. For example, today we listen to a Chopin Ballade and find it powerful and wonderful, but we don’t “hear” the nationalistic message that all Polish émigrés in Paris perceived. We will study music by Chopin, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and others.

177 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley

Africa in Global Context

Martha Saavedra

Consider Africa and its global significance via four themes: identity and culture; conflict; development; and technology. Identify the sociopolitical characteristics of the African continent, engage with contemporary debates regarding the region, and understand the role and impact of Africa in the globalized world. The course also emphasizes the diversity of “Africa,” as illustrated in short stories from the African Caine Prize (http://caineprize.com/).

86 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Nonfiction films are more essential than ever, but the subject matter typically overshadows the process for making them. In fact, the filmmaker’s narrative, thematic, and aesthetic choices are as important as the material itself. Each session will feature a recent or in-progress film followed by a candid discussion with the director.

171 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Navigating Arab Cultures through Arab Cuisines

Haitham Mohamed

Understanding the culture of any region or country is a passport to its languages and provides learners with a method to reply properly and not to be misunderstood. This course highlights the importance of food culture in the Arab world. Navigate through the history of some Arab countries, discovering the beauty and richness of the region.

9 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Postwar American Poetry

Stephanie Wells

In the second half of the twentieth century, American poetry moves away from modernism and splinters in several directions, including beat poetry, confessional poetry, political poetry, and something of a return to nature. Examine these movements since 1950, focusing on representative poets including Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, Bishop, Lowell, Plath, Sexton, Clifton, Rich, Wright, Hass, Oliver, Snyder, Olds, Collins, and Trethewey; exploring their individual works as
well as their poetic lineage.

11 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts April 4

10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Cybersecurity: An Updated Guide for the Perplexed

Darren Zook

Cybersecurity is one of the most important elements in national and international affairs, yet it remains misunderstood. This course will cover everything from personal security online (is Alexa spying on me?) to international threats (what is cyberwar and can it happen?). This material will be presented in a clear and user-friendly format, so both absolute beginners and more experienced tech-users will find much to deepen their understanding.

78 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

French Short Stories

Caroline Smadja

This course, designed around group discussion, will examine French short stories from the late 19th and 20th centuries. Each week will center on a specific author, and all short stories will be different from the first iteration of the course. Participants will be asked to analyze each story in terms of theme(s), meaning, point of view, and other conventions of the short story based on a list of study questions available seven to 10 days in advance. Authors may include Colette, Maupassant, Romain Gary, and Françoise Sagan.

0 slots available
$185.00

Understanding Russia

Anastasia Edel

Russia continues to dominate the news cycle — but how much do you actually know about it? Gain an inside view of Russian history, politics, and culture. What is behind its current slide into autocracy? Which national myths, beliefs, and historic developments feed Putin’s anti-democratic ideology? This course will intertwine the country’s latest political and cultural developments with historical perspectives expressed in film, music, and literature.

57 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing 10-Minute Plays

Anthony Clarvoe

Deepen your appreciation of any dramatic writing you see in theater, film, and television. Discover your dramatic voice. Students will create short plays and scenes through a progressive series of at-home writing exercises and in-class readings. Learn the techniques that compel attention and tell stories through conflict and action.

2 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley
Note change in location

Classical Political Economy in Contemporary Perspective

Alan Karras

This course will examine six themes and theories in classical political economy—and put them into contemporary perspective. The course will explore issues such as: the nature and purpose of government, inequality, the relationship between government and the economy, the ways in which individuals interact with government and vice-versa, industrialization, liberalism, and bureaucracy. Each week will consist of a lecture based on original theorists (such as Rousseau or Smith), followed by a discussion that places these theories in conversation with contemporary and current events.

93 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley
Note change in location

Cosmic Origins

Now, for the first time, we are able to observe the formation of stars and planets, galaxies, the elements, and the universe itself. Just a few physical principles operate to produce it all. Learn what they are in simple terms (no math!), and how they have worked to produce our current cosmos. Encounter the observations that produce this solid empirical understanding of cosmic origins.

103 slots available
$145.00

Six Great Rock and R&B Singers

Peter Elman

Take a cultural and musical journey through the lives and careers of six legendary rock and R&B singers: the “Genius” Ray Charles; the “King of Soul” Sam Cooke; the “Voice” Roy Orbison; Dusty Springfield, the “Big O” Otis Redding; and the “Queen of Soul” Aretha Franklin. Explore these musical giants through lectures, photographs, recorded and live music, film clips, and question-andanswer sessions.

46 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Theater and the Dynamic Outsider

Hilary Roberts

Playwrights often seize on the experience most of us feel at some juncture, of not belonging, and use it as inspiration for outsider opuses for the stage.

20 slots available
$185.00

Friday, Starts April 5

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Great Choreographers

Kathryn Roszak

Learn how the great choreographers transformed the arts and our view of the world. Consider the roots of ballet with Marius Petipa; Isadora Duncan and modern dance; Martha Graham and dance’s relationship to the psyche; Vaslav Nijinsky and his collaborators; Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes; George Balanchine’s reinvention of ballet; and theatrical dance genius Jerome Robbins. We will also define what great choreography means today: Morris, Bausch, Fosse, and more.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iMovie

David Casuto

Explore the fundamentals of creating and producing digital movies in this interactive course. Learn about importing, splicing, trimming, cropping, audio, transition, special effects, text, titles, and much more. The course uses iMovie, a free program found on every Mac (but unavailable on PCs). Learn to create, edit, and produce a full movie with video, photos, audio and text to share with your loved ones. Note: students must provide their own Mac laptops for the class.

6 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals

Danny Neece

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. This class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are helpful but not required. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$225.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

Danny Neece

This session will rely on drawing and sketching as you provide the unique creative approach to the medium. Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

0 slots available
$225.00

Tuesday, Starts January 22

Building A Great Memoir

Louise Nayer

Uncover potent moments from your past through the basic elements of memoir: sensory detail, scene versus summary, dialogue, time shifts, tension, and voice. Read great memoirists to get started. Do in-class exercises and work with peers. Hand in weekly pages for comprehensive instructor feedback. Leave the class with a body of writing.

1 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Global Lens

Michael Fox

The view from abroad is revealing, refreshing, and occasionally jarring. View six films — most of which have never been screened in the United States — and discuss their aims, strategies, choices, and ethics. Examine perennial issues of nonfiction filmmaking, such as point of view, journalism versus activism, truth versus representation, the imperatives and conventions of narrative (i.e., storytelling), and aesthetic choices.

150 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Internment: Lessons in Democracy

John Tateishi

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order that resulted in the exclusion and imprisonment of Japanese Americans as “enemy aliens.” Thirty years later, Japanese Americans demanded redress for their imprisonment. Examine this history, the constitutional issues, and the impact of this period on the treatment of U.S. Arab and Muslim communities since 9/11 and in current immigration deba

7 slots available
$185.00

The Genius of Bach

Stephen Schultz

Cover major aspects of Bach’s instrumental and vocal music. Discuss the principles of historically informed performance practice in relation to modern and period instrument performances. Discover his musical influences as we work our way through the cantatas and Passions, instrumental music, and final masterpieces — B Minor Mass, Goldberg Variations, and the Art of the Fugue.

68 slots available
$145.00

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory. Part 2

Peter Ralston

Learn about neuronal networks and how they are organized in the human brain. Each lecture will begin with an introduction to a basic neuroscience topic, followed by a discussion of related clinical concepts. We will also cover the use of modern technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that reveal both functioning of the normal brain and changes due to disease or injury. There is no prerequisite.

61 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Rock 'n' Roll Road Trip

Peter Elman

Take a chronological and geographic road trip across several American regions where key musical movements sprung up between 1955 and 1970. We’ll also explore Bob Dylan’s 1965 masterworks. Presented as a cultural and musical journey, this course will weave together lectures, photographs, recorded music, film clips, Q&A sessions, and live music.

53 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

The Living New Deal: Remarkable Past, Possible Future

Richard Walker

A wealth of public works was created under President Franklin Roosevelt from 1933 to 1942. We will look at the remarkable legacy of the New Deal; its relevance to the politics of national unity and reconstruction today; and the Living New Deal Project, which has amassed a huge collection of photographs, documents, and other supporting information. Leading project members will teach the class through lectures, discussion, and research. Note: This class begins January 29 and ends March 5.

51 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Wisdom of Grief

Lauren Vanett

There is transformative potential inherent in grieving. We will explore myths and models of grief, obstacles to it, and how personal strengths can support it. Cultivate skills to support others who are grieving by increasing your self-awareness and self-care.

24 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing Children's Picture Books

Dashka Slater

Illustrated children’s books are an enduring and unique form, but how do you go about writing one? Walk through the process from the idea to the finished manuscript. We will do weekly writing assignments and workshop them in class. This class — for experienced and beginning writers alike — will offer a minimum of fear and a maximum of fun. No illustration skills required.

0 slots available
$225.00

Wednesday, Starts January 23

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Relativity and Avant-Garde

Stephanie Wells

The implications of Einstein’s theory of relativity ripple across all areas of thought. Taught concurrently with BAMPFA’s exhibit “Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein,” this literature course will present author philosophies, artist manifestos, cultural essays, poetry, and a novel. We will focus primarily on the dimension of time and how artists and writers of Einstein’s era responded to changing perceptions. We will also visit the exhibit.

-1 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Sacred Mountains of the World

Edwin Bernbaum

From the Sierra Nevada to the Himalayas, mountains have an extraordinary power to evoke wonder, awe, and a sense of the sacred. Drawing on his own research and work with national parks and World Heritage sites, the instructor will take us on a journey to explore the importance and symbolism of mountains in different mythologies, religions, history, literature, and art. We will focus on the key role that mountains play in inspiring environmental conservation and spiritual growth.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Jazz Piano Trio, Part 1

Jeff Denson

Examine selected works by the influential jazz piano trios led by Oscar Peterson, Ahmad Jamal, and Bill Evans. We will emphasize key musical concepts that distinguished their personal styles. The instructor will utilize slides, audio and video recordings, and live demonstrations by renowned jazz artists. While elements of
basic music theory will be discussed, musical training is not a prerequisite.

136 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Columbus and the Pivot of History

Tamim Ansary

Between the 14th and 16th centuries, the world’s center of cultural gravity shifted from societies east of the Mediterranean Sea — the Islamic World, India, China, and the Silk Road civilizations of Central Asia — to Europe, which began its ascent until “Western Civilization” dominated a globalized Earth. The voyages of Christopher Columbus mark the turning point. We will look at the world before and after his voyages and explore how cultural power shifted then — and why it may now be shifting back.

17 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Media Revolutions

David Porush

Expand your understanding of today’s information revolution by looking at how past media revolutions transformed culture, power, morality, intimacy, and views of the cosmos. Our studies will include Paleolithic cave paintings, the birth of writing in the 4th millennium BCE, the advent of the first alphabet, the first books, and the printing press. We will learn how to read ancient scripts, delight in exemplary works of literature, art, and expression, create our own media, and look at how new media are transforming us.

46 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Great Ballad Tradition

Jannie Dresser

From “Sir Patrick Spens” to “Tangled Up in Blue,” ballads tell stories of sunken ships, ghostly lovers, highwaymen, and murderers. Some ballads are set to music, while others, such as “Casey at the Bat,” are part of literature. Trace the Anglo-Celtic ballad tradition with its roots in medieval Britain. Explore its evolution in America as ballads moved west with cowboys and settlers and south to become part of African-American folk culture. End with modern balladeers such as Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, and Mary Chapin Carpenter.

18 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing Between the Lines

Deborah Lichtman

What is the relationship between form and content? How do novelists create suspense with syntax? How can an effective sentence become a brilliant one? Explore these questions by studying the work and techniques of some great prose stylists. Apply what you’ve learned to in-class writing exercises. Lectures will cover topics such as diction, imagery, and cadence, heightening our attention to language, and expanding our repertoire of imaginative prose.

0 slots available
$225.00

Thursday, Starts January 24

10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Food, Drink, Culture, Politics

Darren Zook

Aside from making human life possible, food and drink have generated multiple waves of cultural and political activity throughout human history — some of it celebratory, some of it contentious, and all of it interesting. Explore the many ways that food and drink are intertwined with culture and politics, in the past and present. You’ll never look at what’s on your plate or in your glass the same way again.

10 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Discover how to turn your snapshots into extraordinary photographs using your iPhone. Learn how to expertly capture images, edit and create photographs with your iPhone, gain inspiration to find your creative vision, and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Mindfulness: A Way of Living

Sara Orem

Some people find that mindfulness equals meditation, but others find it difficult to sustain a meditation practice. Explore the concept of mindfulness. Learn how to maintain it in order to deepen awareness of our relationships with each other and our environment, and to cultivate happiness within ourselves. (Note: This course blends online and in-person learning.)

1 slots available
$185.00

The Silver Age of Russian Culture

Elena Sheygal-Placzek

Russian culture at the turn of the 20th century was a dynamic period of experimentation and discoveries in the visual, literary, and performing arts. Explore such brilliant artistic talents as the poetry of Blok, Akhmatova, and Mayakovsky; the music of Stravinsky and Scriabin; Diaghilev’s “Ballets Russes;” and the paintings of Bakst, Roerich, and Malevich. We will also discuss how the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 impacted the arts and the lives of writers, musicians, and artists.

94 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Cities of Intrigue: Capitals of Culture

Bruce Elliott

The most fascinating cities are not always at the center of power, but rather serve as beacons of civilization. Each session will highlight the history, art, and architecture of a distinctive city. We will begin with Florence, which gave rise to the Renaissance, then move to Prague, a key center for the Scientific Revolution. Proceeding to the Enlightenment, we’ll experience Edinburgh and St. Petersburg, then end our journey in Vienna in the Waltz Age and Art Nouveau Barcelona, home ground of Picasso andAntonio Gaudí.

37 slots available
$145.00

Country Music

Peter Elman

Focusing on Nashville, California, and Texas, this course will take us on a regional, chronological, and musical journey through the eras and places that have made country music a huge part of 20th-century American culture. The final class will feature an overview of the country song and an in-depth musical analysis of why country music is so emotional.

41 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Essential Films for Our Times

Richard Saiz

Can we learn new insights into American society — and our current political and social climate — by watching certain films? Do movies influence public opinion or simply reflect it? Examine 10 iconic films to chart the evolution of American society from the 1930s to the 2000s and gain clues about the current zeitgeist. This class will concentrate on five major themes represented in film: class, populism, race, gender, and militarism. Note: This class begins January 31 and ends March 7.

5 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Staging Science: Faustian Experiments

Anthony Clarvoe

The fascinating and troubling figure of the scientist, experiments with the stuff of life, and the desire to go beyond common experience and ethics in search of the unknown all make for groundbreaking theater. We will read and discuss five bold plays, all available on film. From Christopher Marlowe’s legendary seeker Dr. Faustus, to Susan Glaspell’s revolutionary feminist The Verge, to A Disappearing Number, Théâtre de Complicité’s beautiful meditation on mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan, we will grapple with the costs and triumphs of pioneering, blasphemous thought.

10 slots available
$185.00

Friday, Starts January 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals

Danny Neece

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. Whether you are new to watercolor or are familiar with the medium, this class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are helpful but not required. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Beginning Digital Photography

Move beyond the automatic settings of your digital SLR camera and start creating works of art. Learn about the photographic process, including exposure, composition, lighting, and subject matter, and share your work with the class. Participants should have a basic understanding of how their camera works and how to retrieve photos from it. A digital SLR or digital point-and-shoot camera that changes shutter speed and aperture is required.

2 slots available
$225.00

Monday, Starts January 28

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Global Ethnobotany: Plants, People, and Culture

Deepa Natarajan,Thomas Carlson

Humans have utilized plants over millennia for food, fiber, shelter, medicine, art, ritual, scent, dyes, and more. Explore ethnobotany, the study of the complex relationships between people and plants, as we journey through five geographic regions. Topics will include ethnolinguistics, ethnopharmacology, conservation, and biocultural diversity. We will also tour the UC Botanical Garden, which has a globally diverse collection of over 10,000 plants.

0 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

History of Jazz Violin

Kit Eakle

Though sometimes considered an anomaly in jazz, violinists have been central to creating some of its most exciting, innovative music. Discover the reasons for this disconnect, the influential jazz violinists of the past century, and how their music reflects the social, racial, technological, and musical influences of their times. Trace the violin’s influence from the eras of African prehistory, slavery, and “pre-jazz,” to the birth of the blues, swing, be-bop, and beyond. Enjoy vintage recordings and live demonstrations.

8 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

32 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Creative Voices in China: From the Underground to the Internet

Anna Sophie Loewenberg

Whether they are belting out rock tunes or painting portraits, Chinese artists are bold and innovative. Explore the development and significance of China’s arts and culture scene from 1989 through the Internet era. We will also examine the relationship between popular culture and censorship and the impact of creative thinkers and artists on China’s cultural consciousness.

40 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

French Thinkers

Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite

This course will be devoted to the French thinkers who have exercised a decisive influence on world literature and societies because of the quality or originality of their literary works. Writers and topics covered may include Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s theories on the origins of civil society, Simone de Beauvoir’s exploration of gender, Frantz Fanon’s critique of colonialism from the perspective of the colonized, and the works of more recent writers such as Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault.

5 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Landscape Architecture Yesterday and Today

Pierluigi Serraino

As a discipline, architecture is hyper-focused on the appearance, details, and civic presence of individual buildings. Yet architecture and landscape architecture are inseparable parts of the spaces we live in. Increase your awareness of the impact of landscape architecture on the experience of space, whether a backyard garden, park, piazza, or open area.

7 slots available
$145.00

Monday, Starts September 24

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley
Note change in location

Iranian Cinema

Hossein Khosrowjah

Gain an overview of post-revolutionary Iranian national cinema, which has garnered international popularity and critical acclaim since the late 1980s for being innovative, ethical, and compassionate. Look at the work of contemporary filmmakers such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beyzaii, and Asghar Farhadi. Discuss the role of censorship and the strong feminist tendencies of many contemporary Iranian films.

33 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

33 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Shoguns, Samurai, and Survivors: Feudal Japan

Douglas Lee

Explore the cultural history of feudal Japan (1100–1800 CE), when “the Japanese became Japanese” by way of political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes that redirected the course of their civilization.

0 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley
Note change in location

1968 and Its Contested Legacy

Steve Wasserman

Reexamine common perspectives about an unruly year that remains politically and socially radioactive. We will aim to understand what Greil Marcus once called the “moods of rage, excitement, loneliness, fatalism, desire” that buffeted Berkeley and the world in 1968. A half-century later, we still don’t understand its legacy and need a more subtle comprehension of what a historical moment contains, as well as its unacknowledged victories and hidden defeats. 

0 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Exploring Your Identity Through Writing

Anita Amirrezvani

Your unique family, heritage, culture, and traditions offer a rich source of material. Learn how to draw on your own background to generate stories that are deeply meaningful to you, the people you love, and even to complete strangers. Writing assignments will include nonfiction and fiction. Sharing work will be encouraged but not required. Leave class with a roadmap for expanding your material. 

1 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Global Warming: More Than an Inconvenient Truth

Warren Wiscombe

Cover the most salient issues in global warming, including: the history of its research; why the subject exploded in the 1980s; the relationship between the global carbon cycle and the burning of fossil fuels; the campaign against climate science; technological methods for stopping global warming; and changes to greenhouse gases over time. We will finish with speculations about the future of climate and of life on Earth. 

8 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Zen Buddhism and Temple Arts

Marcia Lieberman

Devotion in Buddhist spiritual life is expressed in an array of physical and artistic ways. Through lectures, visual materials, and hands-on practice, we will examine the beauty and creativity of practices such as the enso, zengo work, Japanese landscape gardening, altar care, and the way of tea. What are the aesthetic concerns around these rituals, and how do they impact social interactions? 

16 slots available
$185.00

Tuesday, Starts September 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Chekhov’s Stories

Elena Sheygal-Placzek

While famous worldwide as a playwright, Anton Chekhov is better known and more loved in Russia for his short stories, many of which are considered masterpieces of the genre. Gain insight into some of his best stories and novellas. Discussing a wide spectrum of themes, plots, and characters, we will pay close attention to Chekhovian style and the language resources he employed to render his ideas and attitudes. 

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Is Liberalism Ending?

Beverly Crawford

What is the liberal order, and what are its alternatives? Discuss the history of liberalism, its weaknesses, and the arguments made about its end. We will examine the role of economic inequality, globalization, the retreat of Western liberalism, and the post-truth environment in weakening it further. We will also explore the remedies to save it. 

198 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette
Cancelled

Southern Gothic: Flannery O’Connor

John Campion

Closely review some of Flannery O’ Connor’s disturbing and comic short stories, which embody a critique of Southern society and the flawed vessels who live in it. We’ll follow the pathetic ways her archetypal characters avoid individual pain and responsibility for their actions. We might also discover O’Connor’s greatness — her conveyance that spirit can open up even in the experiences that seem most alien to it.

155 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette
Note change in location

The Book of Genesis: A Good Place to Start

Mark McVann

Compare ancient Israel’s great classic of Genesis to other ancient creation myths. Examine the notion of divine promise in ancestral narratives. Address rituals such as covenant making, circumcision, and animal and human sacrifice. We will also examine the scribal schools that produced the text.

94 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Artful Essays for Pleasure and Publication

Elizabeth Fishel

Learn how to turn your opinions, memories, and ideas into short, shapely works for pleasure or publication. Examine excellent essays by Joan Didion, Anne Lamott, Oliver Sacks, and Nora Ephron, among others. Gain practical tips on style, structure, scene setting, and creating a narrative arc. In-class prompts will kickstart opinion pieces, first-person and travel essays, and blog posts. Receive thoughtful feedback on your work and guidance on where to publish your work in print and online. 

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Nonfiction films are more essential than ever, but the subject matter typically overshadows the process for making them. In fact, the filmmaker’s narrative, thematic, and aesthetic choices are as important as the material itself. Each session will feature a recent or in-progress film followed by a candid discussion with the director. We’ll focus on the practical and ethical challenges of making documentaries, from conception through production and post-production to distribution.

118 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Local Government from the Ground Up

Daren Fields

Have you ever wondered what a mayor really does or where your local tax dollars actually go? Examine how cities, counties, school districts, and special districts are organized. Explore what services they provide and how they impact our daily lives. Discuss local and state ballot measures in the November election. Find out what local government is all about, and learn how you can make a difference in your community. 

0 slots available
$145.00

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory, Part 1

Peter Ralston

Learn about nerve cells and how drugs or disease alter their functioning. We will discuss the organization of neuronal networks that serve major mechanisms, such as hearing and memory. Each lecture will be introduced by a basic neuroscience topic, followed by a discussion of related clinical concepts. This course will contain a mix of new and familiar topics covered in Ralston’s previous classes.

75 slots available
$145.00

Wednesday, Starts September 26

10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Folk Music: The Golden Age 1950–75

Peter Elman

The confluence of people, politics, philosophies, and growing social awareness that came out of the post-WWII era ushered in a new age of enlightenment. Examine the rise of folk music through some of the stars of that period, including Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Harry Belafonte, The Kingston Trio, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Peter Paul and Mary, Judy Collins, the Newport Folk Festival, and the Greenwich Village and North Beach scenes. 

21 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Murder: An Investigation

Like Season One of the popular NPR podcast “Serial,” this course will focus on one murder case. Review original police reports, watch surveillance videos, and hear how a defense investigator examined the physical evidence, found witnesses, and prepared a social history of the defendant’s life. 

1 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Robert Frost’s Poetry of Motion

David Alpaugh

Robert Frost so energized his poems with physical, mental, rhythmical, and figurative motion (and emotion) that they are as powerful today as when his first book debuted in 1913. Join poet David Alpaugh as he performs, savors, and explores “The Road Not Taken,” “Mending Wall,” “Design,” “Home Burial,” and other works. Frost’s legendary public image, troubled personal life, and brilliant comments on the art of poetry will come into play.

30 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Neuroplasticity, Meditation, and Volunteering

Amelia Barili

Meditation and volunteering are good for your heart, brain, and whole being. Combined, they foster positive neuroplasticity. Study the science of neuroplasticity, and meditate to expand your mind and heart. You will also volunteer for one to two hours extra each week at English-in-Action, International House, or Refugee Transitions. This experiential learning will deepen our knowledge of other cultures and help international students, refugees, and immigrants in the often-challenging transition to American life. 

0 slots available
$225.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Romantic Symphony

Alexandra Amati

This course will continue the journey of “The Symphony, Part 1.” Examine how the symphony became the central place for the evolution of musical language from classical clarity and structure to romantic passion and affect. We will also briefly witness the new paths composers delineate, such as the programmatic symphony or the tone poem. 

205 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley
Note change in location

Understanding Russia

Anastasia Edel

Russia continues to dominate the news cycle — but how much do you actually know about it? Gain an inside view of Russian history, politics, and culture. What is behind its current slide into autocracy? Which national myths, beliefs, and historic developments feed Putin’s anti-democratic ideology? This course will intertwine the country’s latest political and cultural developments with historical perspectives expressed in film, music, and literature. 

0 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing Between the Lines

Deborah Lichtman

What is the relationship between form and content? How do novelists create suspense with syntax? How can an effective sentence become a brilliant one? Study the work and techniques of some great prose stylists. Apply what you’ve learned to in-class writing exercises. Lectures will cover diction, imagery, and cadence, heightening our attention to language, and expanding our repertoire of imaginative prose. 

1 slots available
$225.00

Thursday, Starts September 27

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

European Short Stories

Caroline Smadja

Each week will focus on one short story by a master of the genre. Our selection includes “A Misfortune” by Russian Anton Chekhov; “Babette’s Feast,” made into a movie in 1987, by Danish author Karen Blixen; “A Little Cloud” by Irish writer James Joyce; “The Mouse” by Anaïs Nin; a story by Italian author Italo Calvino; and “Armande” by French writer Colette, the first woman of letters to be given a state funeral. 

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Human Rights in Global Politics

Darren Zook

Human rights are often associated with justice, but many people would argue that justice has been scant at best. This course will suggest a different perspective, showing examples where human rights have been most effective and where they are under attack. The biggest obstacle to effectively implementing human rights is the political opportunism that persistently rears its head all over the globe. Explore how that happens, and what can be done about it. 

25 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision, and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$225.00

U.S. Supreme Court: Landmark Cases, Great Justices

Curtis Caton

Explore several momentous U.S. Supreme Court decisions, from Marbury v. Madison and Dred Scott through Roe v. Wade, Bush v. Gore, and Citizens United. We will also focus on some remarkable justices, including John Marshall and Earl Warren, and highlight the challenge of applying the constitution’s general words to very specific, controversial issues. We will also emphasize how the court has reacted to rapidly changing social and political realities as the country has grown. 

21 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Ingmar Bergman's Films

Linda Rugg

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Swedish filmmaker, author, and film director Ingmar Bergman, one of the “auteurs” (authors) hailed in the 1960s by French and American film critics. Bergman’s work was part of a wave of “art cinema,” a form that elevated “movies” to “films.” Analyze six Bergman films and read short pieces by him and by scholars. Discuss the concept of film authorship and Bergman’s life and work.

112 slots available
$145.00

Philosophy for Everyday Life

Rob Merker

We all face big questions every day, from the metaphysical — “What is the purpose of life?” — to the mundane, such as, “Should I give a dollar to that homeless person?” Philosophers have been thinking about these types of questions for thousands of years. We will apply the ideas of philosophers from the ancient past to the lives we lead and questions we ponder today.

98 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Gender Spectrum

Erica Anderson

The Bay Area has been ground zero for social change in the areas of civil rights, free speech, resistance to oppression, sexual revolution, waves of feminism, and gay liberation. Now we face another dramatic revolution in understanding gender and learning how to live in a society in which gender is expressed on a spectrum. New knowledge, healthcare practices, and cultural challenges bring us into a time to learn who we are and how to build an inclusive and accepting society. Note: this class does not meet on October 18, and the final class meeting on October 25 will take place in 41C University Hall.

4 slots available
$145.00

Friday, Starts September 28

10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Drawing Fundamentals (morning)

Danny Neece

Explore the key elements of drawing, including line, shape, tone, compositional design, and the drawing field. Learn how to creatively establish relationships, proportion, and the illusory third dimension, and touch on different modes of abstraction. We will address the role of drawing in imagination, invention, and image development. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you can develop a free and fluent command of the drawing process and a conceptual understanding of key principles.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Memory Book

David Casuto

http://senior-surf.orgCreate beautiful books that tell your stories and memories with printed images, photographs, and text. Learn scanning, editing, enhancing, and touching up, with the ultimate goal of adding your content to a customized online photo book. You may create your books as gifts, personal memoirs, travel journals, or family heirlooms. Bring your own laptops to class. No iPads or tablets, please.

9 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Drawing Fundamentals (afternoon)

Danny Neece

Explore the key elements of drawing, including line, shape, tone, compositional design, and the drawing field. Learn how to creatively establish relationships, proportion, and the illusory third dimension, and touch on different modes of abstraction. We will address the role of drawing in imagination, invention, and image development. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you can develop a free and fluent command of the drawing process and a conceptual understanding of key principles.

0 slots available
$225.00

Wednesday, Starts October 3

2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Life at Home and Aging in Community

Susanne Stadler

A home for growing old gives us the opportunity to stay engaged and useful, remain part of our community, and build confidence when our abilities and strengths decline. Exploring how to live longer and better in one’s home, this course will cover design criteria; adapting your environment to your needs; “smart homes” and personal technology; health care and home-care givers; transitions and downsizing; and community resources. 

39 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts October 25

1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Art and Upheaval

Bill Cleveland

The activities of artists tackling tough community issues in places such as Northern Ireland, Eritrea, Cambodia, and Bosnia are largely unknown. Considered separately, their stories from the world’s frontlines are compelling and inspiring. Taken together, they constitute an important and growing body of work that reveals a lot about how human creativity can help us heal the deepest and most destructive of our self-inflicted wounds.

26 slots available
$145.00