Tuesday, Starts June 4

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley
Note change in location

Infectious Diseases in the News

Deborah Gold

In this course we will consider infectious diseases that made history, those that are currently in the public eye, or both. We will discuss the plague, then and now; influenza from 1918 to recent strains; foodborne and healthcare related infections; the resurgence of childhood related illnesses, and the anti-vaccine movement.

43 slots available
$110.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley
Note change in location

Neoliberalism: Its Rise since 1989 and its Decline since 2008

Andrej Milivojevic

The term neoliberalism has been used broadly, if loosely to signify the global ascendance of financial capitalism, especially since the fall of the Berlin Wall (1989). We will examine the key policies associated with neoliberalism, including the Washington Consensus, various welfare reform and privatization efforts in the 1990s, and the austerity measures taken after the 2008 financial crisis. Throughout, we will discuss how, and whether, the benefits of financial capitalism have been used to offset the burdens it imposes, especially on vulnerable populations, and in doing so we will explore the connection between neoliberalism and inequality.

7 slots available
$110.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Beatles, Part 2:  The White Album and Beyond

Stephen Schultz

The Beatles are the most famous rock group in history. The reasons for this are musical as well as cultural and we will look at the two elements simultaneously. Their late period songs from 1968-70 will be studied, with analysis of the musical and lyrical content and structural elements. What musical styles do the songs address? What were their musical influences? In what ways did their music change over the years? Why were the Beatles so popular and influential?

262 slots available
$110.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

After Fossil Fuels, Then What?

Ed Church

Adapting to climate change, and lessening its effects, means we will need to abandon oil, gas, and coal. But, those fossil fuels are the foundation of our current economy and society. What shifts will occur in how we live our lives as we transition to a "post-carbon society?" This course begins with the latest information on climate change and expands from there, to the human adaptation it will require, especially in the Bay Area. We will examine the highest emitters of greenhouse gases and look at how our lives will change as we reduce their "carbon footprint."

38 slots available
$110.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Charles Mingus: Double Bassist, Composer & Outspoken Political Voice

Jeff Denson

This class will examine the fascinating life and selected works of the influential jazz composer and double bassist, Charles Mingus. We will explore key musical concepts and esthetics that distinguished his personal compositional style and bass playing throughout the various periods of his musical career, and examine how this was shaped by his impassioned character and life experiences. While elements of basic music theory will be discussed, musical training is not a prerequisite.  Live demonstrations by renowned jazz artists are a part of the presentation.

235 slots available
$110.00

Wednesday, Starts June 5

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Austen and Fenimore Cooper: Paths of the 19th-Century Novel

Enrique Lima

Fairly contemporaneous yet radically different, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (1813) and James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans (1826) offer two striking visions of the nineteenth-century novel. One explores country lanes and the intricate workings of society. The other navigates through the violence and beauty of the wilderness. One is a masterwork of style and precision. The other is crude yet visionary. Both are central to the history of the novel. In this class we will read these novels carefully to examine what the early nineteenth century has to tell us about how novels represented the world, imagined social relations, and set out formal and thematic problems that later novels would later take up.

0 slots available
$110.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Women in Rock: From the 1950s to the 1980s

Richie Unterberger

This class will enhance students' appreciation of the evolution of women's role in rock from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, and vividly illustrate how heavily women were involved in rock music's growth during its first quarter-century or so, in numerous styles throughout both North America and the United Kingdom.

261 slots available
$110.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Rehabilitation of Ulysses S. Grant

Mick Chantler

Over the past fifty years, scholars have come to assess the career of Ulysses S. Grant more sympathetically than was once the case. Earlier treatments of both his military and political life were filled with corrosive epithets; contemporary studies, however, emphasize his dogged pursuit of justice for African Americans during Reconstruction, and his attempts to reform and humanize government Indian policy. This course will trace the lengthy and devoted service of an unfairly maligned figure in American history.

187 slots available
$110.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Vision and Art

Tamira Elul

Have you ever wondered how artists create certain visual effects in their paintings? Why do Monet’s poppies seem to bend in the wind; how come the Mona Lisa’s eyes follow you around? In this seminar, students will learn about the neurobiology of vision through art, and about how artists create effects in paintings using properties of our visual system. The course will follow Margaret Livingstone’s book “Vision and Art: The Biology of Seeing”.

5 slots available
$110.00

Thursday, Starts June 6

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Central Europe between the Wars: A Light Extinguished

Bert Gordon

Central Europe between the First and Second World War was home to a vibrant culture that included the likes of Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein. It was also the scene of hyperinflation and depression, leading to the rise of the Nazis and the catastrophe of the Holocaust. The concept of Central Europe was reborn with the end of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s. In recent years, the rise of right-wing nationalist regimes in Hungary, Poland, and elsewhere once again threatens the vibrancy of Central Europe.

0 slots available
$110.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Koru Basic Mindfulness

Kelly Shannon

This course offers a set of techniques and skills to apply mindfulness and meditation in your life. Whether you are seasoned mindfulness practitioner or new to mindfulness, there is something for everyone! The Koru Mindfulness approach is experiential and discussion based. You are invited to ‘try on for size’ the offered techniques and to see for yourself how to best apply them in your life. Each participant is asked to ‘practice’ daily outside of class.  We will look at obstacles arising in your practice as you ‘grow your mindfulness muscle’!

0 slots available
$110.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Muriel Rukeyser: The Poet as Visionary and Activist

Dennis Bernstein

"What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open!" Fifty years ago, the cutting-edge writer and activist Muriel Rukeyser asked and answered this question.  She documented some of the key issues of her time, from the failed Republican uprising against Franco in Spain, to the civil rights and anti-war movements in the United States, to the welcoming of Vietnam into the United Nations. The instructor, a colleague of and collaborator with the late poet, will give students a view into the life of this visionary creator.

12 slots available
$110.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Shakespeare’s Ms-takes

Philippa Kelly

In this course experience professional actors Nancy Carlin and Joy Carlin perform famous monologues in different interpretive tones that highlight themes in very different ways. There will be passages from Romeo and Juliet A Midsummer Night's Dream and King Lear.  So many productions of these three plays "lock" characters - particularly women - into certain interpretive positions. What happens when we perform these passages differently to unlock very different meanings?

17 slots available
$110.00

Monday, Starts April 1

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Islamic Cultures and the West

Simon Kenrick

The course examines the history of relations between the Islamic world and the West via art history and visual culture. Its aim is to put Islamophobia in historical perspective— from the birth of Islam through the 1453 conquest of Constantinople to the impact of 19th century European colonialism. We will see that, aside from tensions, the history of art and visual culture contains countless examples of dialogue and mutual influence.

1 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

37 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Literature and Film of the Weimar Republic

Marion Gerlind

In this interactive seminar we will read and reflect on literature as well as watch and discuss films of the Weimar Republic (1919–33). We will explore some of the period’s most popular works: Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s musical play The Threepenny Opera; Irmgard Keun’s bestseller The Artificial Silk Girl; Leontine Sagan’s classic film Girls in Uniform; Joseph von Sternberg’s original film The Blue Angel; as well as poetry by Else Lasker-Schüler, Gertrud Kolmar, and Mascha Kaléko.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Our Life and Times: A Memoir Writing Workshop

Tamim Ansary

In this workshop, we’ll use the public events of our times as prompts for crafting stories about our own lives. Wars, assassinations, elections, social movements, turning points, transformative inventions, epochal moments in sports, music, arts, and entertainment— all of us have lived personal lives threaded through a public landscape. We will use writing as a vehicle for exploring our lives and the times we’ve lived through.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Tragedy and the Meaning of Life

Bill Smoot

Tragedy seems rooted, as Lukacs wrote, in “the deepest longing of human existence.” This course focuses on three questions: What is the essence of tragedy? What explains the value, meaning, appeal, and pleasure of contemplating literary works that are sad? In what way do tragic works suggest a stance on being or a philosophy of life? Examine five tragic works, and three philosophers—Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche—who meditated on these questions about tragedy.

5 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley

Travel the World Through Textiles

Rose Kelly

Examine historical and contemporary textile traditions from around the world. Look at the symbolism, cultural context, and techniques used in creating traditional textiles, as well as their role in today’s economy. We will focus on the textiles of Latin America, Africa, and Asia and study examples from Kelly’s collection as well as your collections.

1 slots available
$145.00

Tuesday, Starts April 2

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Architectural Expression: The Root of Design Style

Pierluigi Serraino

What is the difference between style and architectural expression? Explore this central question by considering building exteriors and interiors as well as product designs. Learn to read a space through its architectural expression by engaging the writings of the masters of past, modern, and contemporary eras to apprehend what Le Corbusier called “the fundamental joys of architecture.”

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Dreamwork and Archetypal Mythology

Barry Friedman

Dreams are vehicles to help us realize who we are and who we can become, as well as understand our relationship to the world and the divine. Learn how to work deeply with your dreams through personal sharing and response. Discuss major archetypal motifs that appear in our dreams and connect us to the world of mythology and meaning. This creative process is at once enlightening, transformative, and healing.

9 slots available
$225.00

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center -- Arts & Sciences Room, Lafayette
Note change in location

Iranian Cinema

Hossein Khosrowjah

Gain an overview of post-revolutionary Iranian national cinema, which has garnered international popularity and critical acclaim since the late 1980s for being innovative, ethical, and compassionate. Look at the work of contemporary filmmakers such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beyzaii, and Asghar Farhadi. Discuss the role of censorship and the strong feminist tendencies of many contemporary Iranian films.

28 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Rock 'n' Roll Road Trip, Part 2

Peter Elman

Take a chronological and geographic road trip across several American regions where key musical movements sprung up between 1965 and 1975. We’ll also explore one rock ’n’ roll legend’s masterworks. Presented as a cultural and musical journey, the course will weave together lectures, photographs, recorded music, film clips, Q&A sessions, and live music.

120 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley

Dazzling Dames of Broadway

Bonnie Weiss

Examine the lives of some of Broadway’s most celebrated leading ladies. Delve into the triumphs, tragedies, regrets, and joys of their personal lives. We will discuss Ethel Merman, Mary Martin, Julie Andrews, Carol Channing, Gwen Verdon, and Bernadette Peters, as well as more recent leading ladies of Broadway, such as Patti Lupone, Kristin Chenoweth, and Audra McDonald.

91 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Exploring Your Identity Through Writing

Anita Amirrezvani

Your unique family, heritage, culture, and traditions offer a rich source of material. Learn how to draw on your own background to generate stories that are deeply meaningful to you, the people you love, and even to complete strangers. Writing assignments will include nonfiction and fiction. Sharing work will be encouraged but not required. Leave class with a roadmap for expanding your material.

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Expanded Self

Lauren Vanett

This course is an opportunity to appreciate who you are and who you would like to be. Reflect on past challenges and successes, cultivate self-compassion, and envision your best possible future. This hands-on journey uses mindfulness meditation and evidence- based practices from positive psychology, builds awareness of how to move beyond self-limiting beliefs, and exposes hidden capacities that you can use to activate your inner and outer life.

2 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

The Magic of Mozart: Adventures in Operatic Elegance

Clifford "Kip" Cranna

Explore Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s operatic genius. View his works in their historical contexts and consider Mozart’s gift for capturing the full spectrum of human nature. Examine his early influences, follow his career, and explore his most famous works, including The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and The Magic Flute, as well as lesser-known gems. No previous opera background required. Just watch, listen, and enjoy.

117 slots available
$145.00

U.S./Mexico Relations from Reagan to Trump

Alex Saragoza

Examine the relationship between the U.S. and Mexico from the Reagan presidency (1980-1988) to the present. Emphasis will be given to the current state of that relationship in light of the election of a reformist, leftof-center Mexican president in November 2018 and the Trump administration. We will discuss the border, immigration, NAFTA, the drug trade, Central American migration, energy and transnational cultural flows, as well as other related topics.

64 slots available
$145.00

Wednesday, Starts April 3

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Current Issues Before the U.S. Supreme Court

Marshall Krause

Review undecided cases now pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. Is there an exemption to anti-discrimination laws when they conflict with religious beliefs? Does gerrymandering congressional districts for political advantage violate the constitution? Does a suspected undocumented immigrant have the right to release on bail? Note: This course relies on class participation and is ideal for students who have taken a previous class with Krause or who have legal experience.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

International Women Film Directors

Linda Lau

This course examines films directed by women from different cultures and backgrounds. Each week focuses on one director and one film. Throughout the course, we will address the following questions: What types of oppression do women experience and how is this portrayed in film? How do female directors subvert traditional gender roles? What role do women directors play in changing the idea of culture?

40 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Poetry on the Ivories: Romantic Piano Music

Alexandra Amati

Explore the Romantic phenomenon of the miniature or “character” piano piece. Learn about genres and forms, codes, interpretations, and covert political implications. For example, today we listen to a Chopin Ballade and find it powerful and wonderful, but we don’t “hear” the nationalistic message that all Polish émigrés in Paris perceived. We will study music by Chopin, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and others.

177 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley

Africa in Global Context

Martha Saavedra

Consider Africa and its global significance via four themes: identity and culture; conflict; development; and technology. Identify the sociopolitical characteristics of the African continent, engage with contemporary debates regarding the region, and understand the role and impact of Africa in the globalized world. The course also emphasizes the diversity of “Africa,” as illustrated in short stories from the African Caine Prize (http://caineprize.com/).

85 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Nonfiction films are more essential than ever, but the subject matter typically overshadows the process for making them. In fact, the filmmaker’s narrative, thematic, and aesthetic choices are as important as the material itself. Each session will feature a recent or in-progress film followed by a candid discussion with the director.

171 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Navigating Arab Cultures through Arab Cuisines

Haitham Mohamed

Understanding the culture of any region or country is a passport to its languages and provides learners with a method to reply properly and not to be misunderstood. This course highlights the importance of food culture in the Arab world. Navigate through the history of some Arab countries, discovering the beauty and richness of the region.

9 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Postwar American Poetry

Stephanie Wells

In the second half of the twentieth century, American poetry moves away from modernism and splinters in several directions, including beat poetry, confessional poetry, political poetry, and something of a return to nature. Examine these movements since 1950, focusing on representative poets including Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, Bishop, Lowell, Plath, Sexton, Clifton, Rich, Wright, Hass, Oliver, Snyder, Olds, Collins, and Trethewey; exploring their individual works as
well as their poetic lineage.

11 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts April 4

10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Cybersecurity: An Updated Guide for the Perplexed

Darren Zook

Cybersecurity is one of the most important elements in national and international affairs, yet it remains misunderstood. This course will cover everything from personal security online (is Alexa spying on me?) to international threats (what is cyberwar and can it happen?). This material will be presented in a clear and user-friendly format, so both absolute beginners and more experienced tech-users will find much to deepen their understanding.

78 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

French Short Stories

Caroline Smadja

This course, designed around group discussion, will examine French short stories from the late 19th and 20th centuries. Each week will center on a specific author, and all short stories will be different from the first iteration of the course. Participants will be asked to analyze each story in terms of theme(s), meaning, point of view, and other conventions of the short story based on a list of study questions available seven to 10 days in advance. Authors may include Colette, Maupassant, Romain Gary, and Françoise Sagan.

0 slots available
$185.00

Understanding Russia

Anastasia Edel

Russia continues to dominate the news cycle — but how much do you actually know about it? Gain an inside view of Russian history, politics, and culture. What is behind its current slide into autocracy? Which national myths, beliefs, and historic developments feed Putin’s anti-democratic ideology? This course will intertwine the country’s latest political and cultural developments with historical perspectives expressed in film, music, and literature.

58 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing 10-Minute Plays

Anthony Clarvoe

Deepen your appreciation of any dramatic writing you see in theater, film, and television. Discover your dramatic voice. Students will create short plays and scenes through a progressive series of at-home writing exercises and in-class readings. Learn the techniques that compel attention and tell stories through conflict and action.

2 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Magnes Collection, Berkeley
Note change in location

Classical Political Economy in Contemporary Perspective

Alan Karras

This course will examine six themes and theories in classical political economy—and put them into contemporary perspective. The course will explore issues such as: the nature and purpose of government, inequality, the relationship between government and the economy, the ways in which individuals interact with government and vice-versa, industrialization, liberalism, and bureaucracy. Each week will consist of a lecture based on original theorists (such as Rousseau or Smith), followed by a discussion that places these theories in conversation with contemporary and current events.

92 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage, Berkeley
Note change in location

Cosmic Origins

Gibor Basri

Now, for the first time, we are able to observe the formation of stars and planets, galaxies, the elements, and the universe itself. Just a few physical principles operate to produce it all. Learn what they are in simple terms (no math!), and how they have worked to produce our current cosmos. Encounter the observations that produce this solid empirical understanding of cosmic origins.

105 slots available
$145.00

Six Great Rock and R&B Singers

Peter Elman

Take a cultural and musical journey through the lives and careers of six legendary rock and R&B singers: the “Genius” Ray Charles; the “King of Soul” Sam Cooke; the “Voice” Roy Orbison; Dusty Springfield, the “Big O” Otis Redding; and the “Queen of Soul” Aretha Franklin. Explore these musical giants through lectures, photographs, recorded and live music, film clips, and question-andanswer sessions.

46 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Theater and the Dynamic Outsider

Hilary Roberts

Playwrights often seize on the experience most of us feel at some juncture, of not belonging, and use it as inspiration for outsider opuses for the stage.

20 slots available
$185.00

Friday, Starts April 5

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Great Choreographers

Kathryn Roszak

Learn how the great choreographers transformed the arts and our view of the world. Consider the roots of ballet with Marius Petipa; Isadora Duncan and modern dance; Martha Graham and dance’s relationship to the psyche; Vaslav Nijinsky and his collaborators; Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes; George Balanchine’s reinvention of ballet; and theatrical dance genius Jerome Robbins. We will also define what great choreography means today: Morris, Bausch, Fosse, and more.

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iMovie

David Casuto

Explore the fundamentals of creating and producing digital movies in this interactive course. Learn about importing, splicing, trimming, cropping, audio, transition, special effects, text, titles, and much more. The course uses iMovie, a free program found on every Mac (but unavailable on PCs). Learn to create, edit, and produce a full movie with video, photos, audio and text to share with your loved ones. Note: students must provide their own Mac laptops for the class.

6 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Watercolor Fundamentals

Danny Neece

Learn the basics of watercolor. We will cover the principles of color theory, color mixing, paint layering, and texture through still life, landscapes, wildlife, and more. This class is open to all levels. Basic drawing skills are helpful but not required. Course fee does not include materials (approximately $70).

0 slots available
$225.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Pen and Ink Fundamentals

Danny Neece

This session will rely on drawing and sketching as you provide the unique creative approach to the medium. Learn techniques for effectively working with pen, brush, and inks. Subjects will range from still life to working from photos. Topics will include loose sketching, contrast, texturing, hatching techniques, composition, and illustration. All skill levels welcome.

0 slots available
$225.00

Monday, Starts September 24

10:00am - 12:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley
Note change in location

Iranian Cinema

Hossein Khosrowjah

Gain an overview of post-revolutionary Iranian national cinema, which has garnered international popularity and critical acclaim since the late 1980s for being innovative, ethical, and compassionate. Look at the work of contemporary filmmakers such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beyzaii, and Asghar Farhadi. Discuss the role of censorship and the strong feminist tendencies of many contemporary Iranian films.

33 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Joy of Singing

Lauren Carley

Prepare your body, brain, and voice to sing with ease, expressiveness, and projection. Learn four traditional rounds and five part-songs by ear, plus choral skills such as legato, staccato, fermata, ritard, timbre, and head and chest voice. More experienced participants may sing in trios or anchor their sections. We will perform for invited guests during the last class. Open to all levels.

33 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Shoguns, Samurai, and Survivors: Feudal Japan

Douglas Lee

Explore the cultural history of feudal Japan (1100–1800 CE), when “the Japanese became Japanese” by way of political, socioeconomic, and cultural changes that redirected the course of their civilization.

0 slots available
$185.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
California Jazz Conservatory - Rendon Hall, Berkeley
Note change in location

1968 and Its Contested Legacy

Steve Wasserman

Reexamine common perspectives about an unruly year that remains politically and socially radioactive. We will aim to understand what Greil Marcus once called the “moods of rage, excitement, loneliness, fatalism, desire” that buffeted Berkeley and the world in 1968. A half-century later, we still don’t understand its legacy and need a more subtle comprehension of what a historical moment contains, as well as its unacknowledged victories and hidden defeats. 

0 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Exploring Your Identity Through Writing

Anita Amirrezvani

Your unique family, heritage, culture, and traditions offer a rich source of material. Learn how to draw on your own background to generate stories that are deeply meaningful to you, the people you love, and even to complete strangers. Writing assignments will include nonfiction and fiction. Sharing work will be encouraged but not required. Leave class with a roadmap for expanding your material. 

1 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Global Warming: More Than an Inconvenient Truth

Warren Wiscombe

Cover the most salient issues in global warming, including: the history of its research; why the subject exploded in the 1980s; the relationship between the global carbon cycle and the burning of fossil fuels; the campaign against climate science; technological methods for stopping global warming; and changes to greenhouse gases over time. We will finish with speculations about the future of climate and of life on Earth. 

8 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Zen Buddhism and Temple Arts

Marcia Lieberman

Devotion in Buddhist spiritual life is expressed in an array of physical and artistic ways. Through lectures, visual materials, and hands-on practice, we will examine the beauty and creativity of practices such as the enso, zengo work, Japanese landscape gardening, altar care, and the way of tea. What are the aesthetic concerns around these rituals, and how do they impact social interactions? 

16 slots available
$185.00

Tuesday, Starts September 25

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Chekhov’s Stories

Elena Sheygal-Placzek

While famous worldwide as a playwright, Anton Chekhov is better known and more loved in Russia for his short stories, many of which are considered masterpieces of the genre. Gain insight into some of his best stories and novellas. Discussing a wide spectrum of themes, plots, and characters, we will pay close attention to Chekhovian style and the language resources he employed to render his ideas and attitudes. 

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Is Liberalism Ending?

Beverly Crawford

What is the liberal order, and what are its alternatives? Discuss the history of liberalism, its weaknesses, and the arguments made about its end. We will examine the role of economic inequality, globalization, the retreat of Western liberalism, and the post-truth environment in weakening it further. We will also explore the remedies to save it. 

198 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette
Cancelled

Southern Gothic: Flannery O’Connor

John Campion

Closely review some of Flannery O’ Connor’s disturbing and comic short stories, which embody a critique of Southern society and the flawed vessels who live in it. We’ll follow the pathetic ways her archetypal characters avoid individual pain and responsibility for their actions. We might also discover O’Connor’s greatness — her conveyance that spirit can open up even in the experiences that seem most alien to it.

155 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Lafayette Library and Learning Center - Community Hall, Lafayette
Note change in location

The Book of Genesis: A Good Place to Start

Mark McVann

Compare ancient Israel’s great classic of Genesis to other ancient creation myths. Examine the notion of divine promise in ancestral narratives. Address rituals such as covenant making, circumcision, and animal and human sacrifice. We will also examine the scribal schools that produced the text.

94 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:30pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Artful Essays for Pleasure and Publication

Elizabeth Fishel

Learn how to turn your opinions, memories, and ideas into short, shapely works for pleasure or publication. Examine excellent essays by Joan Didion, Anne Lamott, Oliver Sacks, and Nora Ephron, among others. Gain practical tips on style, structure, scene setting, and creating a narrative arc. In-class prompts will kickstart opinion pieces, first-person and travel essays, and blog posts. Receive thoughtful feedback on your work and guidance on where to publish your work in print and online. 

0 slots available
$225.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Bay Area Documentary Filmmakers

Michael Fox

Nonfiction films are more essential than ever, but the subject matter typically overshadows the process for making them. In fact, the filmmaker’s narrative, thematic, and aesthetic choices are as important as the material itself. Each session will feature a recent or in-progress film followed by a candid discussion with the director. We’ll focus on the practical and ethical challenges of making documentaries, from conception through production and post-production to distribution.

118 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Local Government from the Ground Up

Daren Fields

Have you ever wondered what a mayor really does or where your local tax dollars actually go? Examine how cities, counties, school districts, and special districts are organized. Explore what services they provide and how they impact our daily lives. Discuss local and state ballot measures in the November election. Find out what local government is all about, and learn how you can make a difference in your community. 

0 slots available
$145.00

Our Brains: Molecules to Memory, Part 1

Peter Ralston

Learn about nerve cells and how drugs or disease alter their functioning. We will discuss the organization of neuronal networks that serve major mechanisms, such as hearing and memory. Each lecture will be introduced by a basic neuroscience topic, followed by a discussion of related clinical concepts. This course will contain a mix of new and familiar topics covered in Ralston’s previous classes.

75 slots available
$145.00

Wednesday, Starts September 26

10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Folk Music: The Golden Age 1950–75

Peter Elman

The confluence of people, politics, philosophies, and growing social awareness that came out of the post-WWII era ushered in a new age of enlightenment. Examine the rise of folk music through some of the stars of that period, including Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Harry Belafonte, The Kingston Trio, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Peter Paul and Mary, Judy Collins, the Newport Folk Festival, and the Greenwich Village and North Beach scenes. 

21 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Murder: An Investigation

Like Season One of the popular NPR podcast “Serial,” this course will focus on one murder case. Review original police reports, watch surveillance videos, and hear how a defense investigator examined the physical evidence, found witnesses, and prepared a social history of the defendant’s life. 

1 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Robert Frost’s Poetry of Motion

David Alpaugh

Robert Frost so energized his poems with physical, mental, rhythmical, and figurative motion (and emotion) that they are as powerful today as when his first book debuted in 1913. Join poet David Alpaugh as he performs, savors, and explores “The Road Not Taken,” “Mending Wall,” “Design,” “Home Burial,” and other works. Frost’s legendary public image, troubled personal life, and brilliant comments on the art of poetry will come into play.

30 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Neuroplasticity, Meditation, and Volunteering

Amelia Barili

Meditation and volunteering are good for your heart, brain, and whole being. Combined, they foster positive neuroplasticity. Study the science of neuroplasticity, and meditate to expand your mind and heart. You will also volunteer for one to two hours extra each week at English-in-Action, International House, or Refugee Transitions. This experiential learning will deepen our knowledge of other cultures and help international students, refugees, and immigrants in the often-challenging transition to American life. 

0 slots available
$225.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

The Romantic Symphony

Alexandra Amati

This course will continue the journey of “The Symphony, Part 1.” Examine how the symphony became the central place for the evolution of musical language from classical clarity and structure to romantic passion and affect. We will also briefly witness the new paths composers delineate, such as the programmatic symphony or the tone poem. 

205 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Berkeley City College Auditorium, Berkeley
Note change in location

Understanding Russia

Anastasia Edel

Russia continues to dominate the news cycle — but how much do you actually know about it? Gain an inside view of Russian history, politics, and culture. What is behind its current slide into autocracy? Which national myths, beliefs, and historic developments feed Putin’s anti-democratic ideology? This course will intertwine the country’s latest political and cultural developments with historical perspectives expressed in film, music, and literature. 

0 slots available
$145.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

Writing Between the Lines

Deborah Lichtman

What is the relationship between form and content? How do novelists create suspense with syntax? How can an effective sentence become a brilliant one? Study the work and techniques of some great prose stylists. Apply what you’ve learned to in-class writing exercises. Lectures will cover diction, imagery, and cadence, heightening our attention to language, and expanding our repertoire of imaginative prose. 

1 slots available
$225.00

Thursday, Starts September 27

10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

European Short Stories

Caroline Smadja

Each week will focus on one short story by a master of the genre. Our selection includes “A Misfortune” by Russian Anton Chekhov; “Babette’s Feast,” made into a movie in 1987, by Danish author Karen Blixen; “A Little Cloud” by Irish writer James Joyce; “The Mouse” by Anaïs Nin; a story by Italian author Italo Calvino; and “Armande” by French writer Colette, the first woman of letters to be given a state funeral. 

0 slots available
$185.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Human Rights in Global Politics

Darren Zook

Human rights are often associated with justice, but many people would argue that justice has been scant at best. This course will suggest a different perspective, showing examples where human rights have been most effective and where they are under attack. The biggest obstacle to effectively implementing human rights is the political opportunism that persistently rears its head all over the globe. Explore how that happens, and what can be done about it. 

25 slots available
$145.00
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Hall Room 41C, Berkeley

iPhoneography

Laura (Yoni) Mayeri

Learn how to expertly capture images, edit, and create extraordinary photographs using solely your iPhone. Gain inspiration to find your creative vision, and expand your technical knowledge. By the end of this workshop, you will understand the ins and outs of iPhone photography.

0 slots available
$225.00

U.S. Supreme Court: Landmark Cases, Great Justices

Curtis Caton

Explore several momentous U.S. Supreme Court decisions, from Marbury v. Madison and Dred Scott through Roe v. Wade, Bush v. Gore, and Citizens United. We will also focus on some remarkable justices, including John Marshall and Earl Warren, and highlight the challenge of applying the constitution’s general words to very specific, controversial issues. We will also emphasize how the court has reacted to rapidly changing social and political realities as the country has grown. 

21 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse, Berkeley

Ingmar Bergman's Films

Linda Rugg

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Swedish filmmaker, author, and film director Ingmar Bergman, one of the “auteurs” (authors) hailed in the 1960s by French and American film critics. Bergman’s work was part of a wave of “art cinema,” a form that elevated “movies” to “films.” Analyze six Bergman films and read short pieces by him and by scholars. Discuss the concept of film authorship and Bergman’s life and work.

112 slots available
$145.00

Philosophy for Everyday Life

Rob Merker

We all face big questions every day, from the metaphysical — “What is the purpose of life?” — to the mundane, such as, “Should I give a dollar to that homeless person?” Philosophers have been thinking about these types of questions for thousands of years. We will apply the ideas of philosophers from the ancient past to the lives we lead and questions we ponder today.

98 slots available
$145.00
1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

The Gender Spectrum

Erica Anderson

The Bay Area has been ground zero for social change in the areas of civil rights, free speech, resistance to oppression, sexual revolution, waves of feminism, and gay liberation. Now we face another dramatic revolution in understanding gender and learning how to live in a society in which gender is expressed on a spectrum. New knowledge, healthcare practices, and cultural challenges bring us into a time to learn who we are and how to build an inclusive and accepting society. Note: this class does not meet on October 18, and the final class meeting on October 25 will take place in 41C University Hall.

4 slots available
$145.00

Friday, Starts September 28

10:00am - 12:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Drawing Fundamentals (morning)

Danny Neece

Explore the key elements of drawing, including line, shape, tone, compositional design, and the drawing field. Learn how to creatively establish relationships, proportion, and the illusory third dimension, and touch on different modes of abstraction. We will address the role of drawing in imagination, invention, and image development. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you can develop a free and fluent command of the drawing process and a conceptual understanding of key principles.

0 slots available
$225.00
10:00am - 12:30pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Memory Book

David Casuto

http://senior-surf.orgCreate beautiful books that tell your stories and memories with printed images, photographs, and text. Learn scanning, editing, enhancing, and touching up, with the ultimate goal of adding your content to a customized online photo book. You may create your books as gifts, personal memoirs, travel journals, or family heirlooms. Bring your own laptops to class. No iPads or tablets, please.

9 slots available
$185.00
2:00pm - 4:00pm
UC Berkeley Art Studio, Berkeley

Drawing Fundamentals (afternoon)

Danny Neece

Explore the key elements of drawing, including line, shape, tone, compositional design, and the drawing field. Learn how to creatively establish relationships, proportion, and the illusory third dimension, and touch on different modes of abstraction. We will address the role of drawing in imagination, invention, and image development. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you can develop a free and fluent command of the drawing process and a conceptual understanding of key principles.

0 slots available
$225.00

Wednesday, Starts October 3

2:00pm - 4:00pm
University Hall Room 41B, Berkeley

Life at Home and Aging in Community

Susanne Stadler

A home for growing old gives us the opportunity to stay engaged and useful, remain part of our community, and build confidence when our abilities and strengths decline. Exploring how to live longer and better in one’s home, this course will cover design criteria; adapting your environment to your needs; “smart homes” and personal technology; health care and home-care givers; transitions and downsizing; and community resources. 

39 slots available
$145.00

Thursday, Starts October 25

1:00pm - 3:00pm
University Hall Room 150, Berkeley

Art and Upheaval

Bill Cleveland

The activities of artists tackling tough community issues in places such as Northern Ireland, Eritrea, Cambodia, and Bosnia are largely unknown. Considered separately, their stories from the world’s frontlines are compelling and inspiring. Taken together, they constitute an important and growing body of work that reveals a lot about how human creativity can help us heal the deepest and most destructive of our self-inflicted wounds.

26 slots available
$145.00